Indiscriminate interspecific aggression leading to almost sole occupancy of space by a single species of bird

Dow D.D. (1977) Indiscriminate interspecific aggression leading to almost sole occupancy of space by a single species of bird. Emu, 77 3: 115-121. doi:10.1071/MU9770115


Author Dow D.D.
Title Indiscriminate interspecific aggression leading to almost sole occupancy of space by a single species of bird
Journal name Emu   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1448-5540
Publication date 1977-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/MU9770115
Volume 77
Issue 3
Start page 115
End page 121
Total pages 7
Subject 1105 Dentistry
1103 Clinical Sciences
2309 Nature and Landscape Conservation
Abstract Noisy Miners Manorina melanocephala, Australian honeyeaters, reside and feed in dense colonies in open woodland all year. All other species entering these colonies are attacked, sometimes killed. M. melanocephala, through group aggression, successfully defends its colonies against intrusion and settlement by other species of birds. Comparison with scarcer populations in more structurally complex woodland, where the species is less able to eliminate others, suggests that the advantage gained by the interspecific aggression pertains to food resources, because the species forages more in a wider range of feeding zones in areas where possible competitors have been ousted. By eliminating virtually all competitors, M. melanocephala gains exclusive use of all food resources in its colonies. Such interspecific interaction is unique among birds and possibly among animals in general. Also, M. melanocephala breeds communally, i.e. many individuals feed the young in a single nest. Food items given to the young are usually very small and the number of feeding trips to the nest extremely high. This high rate of feeding may be necessitated by the relatively greater abundance of small insects, which in turn could be due to the complete absence of smaller avian competitors.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Created: Tue, 23 Aug 2016, 11:26:09 EST by System User