Behavioural postures and the rate of body temperature change in wild freshwater crocodiles, Crocodylus johnstoni

Seebacher F. (1999) Behavioural postures and the rate of body temperature change in wild freshwater crocodiles, Crocodylus johnstoni. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, 72 1: 57-63. doi:10.1086/316638

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ400190_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 144.07KB 0

Author Seebacher F.
Title Behavioural postures and the rate of body temperature change in wild freshwater crocodiles, Crocodylus johnstoni
Journal name Physiological and Biochemical Zoology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1522-2152
Publication date 1999-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/316638
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 72
Issue 1
Start page 57
End page 63
Total pages 7
Subject 1103 Clinical Sciences
1314 Physiology
2737 Physiology (medical)
Abstract I recorded body temperature and behaviour of eight Crocodylus johnstoni in the wild over a 2-yr period in order to quantify the effect of posturing on body temperature and to provide a mechanistic explanation of how behaviour affects body temperature. Behaviour was categorised according to the proportion of a crocodile's surface area exposed from the water (0% exposed [=diving] to 100% exposed [=basking]). Crocodiles did not simply shuttle between the extremes of 100% exposed and diving but showed an array of intermediate postures. Rates of body temperature change were negative for exposures less than 40% and positive for 60%-100% exposed. This was due to the difference between operative temperature and body temperature, which was negative during diving but increased with the percentage of exposure, up to 25 degrees-30 degrees C during basking. For any particular posture, the rate of body temperature change decreased with increasing mass. Thermal time constants were shortest during diving and longest during basking. A heat-transfer equation predicted the rate of body temperature change well, except that it underestimated the rate of body temperature change during 80% and 100% exposed. Exposing only a small part of their body when in water (20%) slowed heat loss considerably, allowing crocodiles to spend more time in the water while maintaining body temperature within their preferred body temperature range.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 41 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 41 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 16 Aug 2016, 13:24:27 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)