Disentangling the effect of event-based cues on children's time-based prospective memory performance

Redshaw, Jonathan, Henry, Julie D. and Suddendorf, Thomas (2016) Disentangling the effect of event-based cues on children's time-based prospective memory performance. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 150 130-140. doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2016.05.008


Author Redshaw, Jonathan
Henry, Julie D.
Suddendorf, Thomas
Title Disentangling the effect of event-based cues on children's time-based prospective memory performance
Journal name Journal of Experimental Child Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0965
1096-0457
Publication date 2016-10-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.05.008
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 150
Start page 130
End page 140
Total pages 11
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Abstract Previous time-based prospective memory research, both with children and with other groups, has measured the ability to perform an action with the arrival of a time-dependent yet still event-based cue (e.g., the occurrence of a specific clock pattern) while also engaged in an ongoing activity. Here we introduce a novel means of operationalizing time-based prospective memory and assess children's growing capacities when the availability of an event-based cue is varied. Preschoolers aged 3, 4, and 5 years (N = 72) were required to ring a bell when a familiar 1-min sand timer had completed a cycle under four conditions. In a 2 x 2 within-participants design, the timer was either visible or hidden and was either presented in the context of a single task or embedded within a dual picture-naming task. Children were more likely to ring the bell before 2 min had elapsed in the visible-timer and single-task conditions, with performance improving with age across all conditions. These results suggest a divergence in the development of time-based prospective memory in the presence versus absence of event-based cues, and they also suggest that performance on typical time-based tasks may be partly driven by event-based prospective memory. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract
Previous time-based prospective memory research, both with children and with other groups, has measured the ability to perform an action with the arrival of a time-dependent yet still event-based cue (e.g., the occurrence of a specific clock pattern) while also engaged in an ongoing activity. Here we introduce a novel means of operationalizing time-based prospective memory and assess children's growing capacities when the availability of an event-based cue is varied. Preschoolers aged 3, 4, and 5 years (N = 72) were required to ring a bell when a familiar 1-min sand timer had completed a cycle under four conditions. In a 2 × 2 within-participants design, the timer was either visible or hidden and was either presented in the context of a single task or embedded within a dual picture-naming task. Children were more likely to ring the bell before 2 min had elapsed in the visible-timer and single-task conditions, with performance improving with age across all conditions. These results suggest a divergence in the development of time-based prospective memory in the presence versus absence of event-based cues, and they also suggest that performance on typical time-based tasks may be partly driven by event-based prospective memory.
Keyword Developmental psychology
Episodic foresight
Executive function
Prospection
Prospective memory
Time monitoring
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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