Effect of phosphate on the macromolecular state of bovine neurophysin

Tellam R. and Winzor D.J. (1980) Effect of phosphate on the macromolecular state of bovine neurophysin. Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 201 1: 20-24. doi:10.1016/0003-9861(80)90482-8


Author Tellam R.
Winzor D.J.
Title Effect of phosphate on the macromolecular state of bovine neurophysin
Journal name Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1096-0384
Publication date 1980-04-15
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/0003-9861(80)90482-8
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 201
Issue 1
Start page 20
End page 24
Total pages 5
Subject 1303 Specialist Studies in Education
1304 Biophysics
1312 Molecular Biology
Abstract Bovine neurophysin II has been subjected to equilibrium sedimentation in 0.1 m phosphate, pH 5.8, and in 0.1 I acetate, pH 5.6. Under the former conditions the molecular weight is 20,000, which is consistent with the concept that neurophysin is dimeric in the phosphate medium. In acetate the molecular weight varies with neurophysin concentration in conformity with this carrier protein being a monomer-dimer system governed by an association equilibrium constant of 5800 m-1. This investigation has thus confirmed that the disparity between two previous ultracentrifuge studies of bovine neurophysin II reflected a genuine difference in the macromolecular state of the protein under the conditions employed. The implications of this difference are discussed in relation to the nature of the macromolecular interactions that are responsible for the cooperative binding of oxytocin to neurophysin.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Created: Tue, 16 Aug 2016, 11:41:53 EST by System User