Intestinal amoebiasis and amoebic liver abscess in Brisbane, 1956 to 1973. Clinical syndromes and the results of medical and surgical management

Ravenscroft P.J., Douglas J.B., Emmerson B.T., Harris O.D. and Rao A. (1975) Intestinal amoebiasis and amoebic liver abscess in Brisbane, 1956 to 1973. Clinical syndromes and the results of medical and surgical management. Medical Journal of Australia, 1 18: 551-555.

Author Ravenscroft P.J.
Douglas J.B.
Emmerson B.T.
Harris O.D.
Rao A.
Title Intestinal amoebiasis and amoebic liver abscess in Brisbane, 1956 to 1973. Clinical syndromes and the results of medical and surgical management
Journal name Medical Journal of Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-729X
Publication date 1975-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 1
Issue 18
Start page 551
End page 555
Total pages 5
Language eng
Subject 2700 Medicine
Abstract Nineteen patients presented to teaching hospitals in Brisbane with symptomatic amoebiasis from 1965 to 1973. The majority of patients gave a history of overseas travel or residence. Intestinal amoebiasis most frequently occurred in its non dysenteric form, so that there were some problems in differentiating it from more commonly occurring forms of colitis. The potential for amoeboma to be mistaken for a neoplasm was evident. Amoebic liver abscess was confirmed in 10 cases and, in nine of these, the abscess was localized to the right lobe of the liver. A total colectomy had been performed in one case and an abdominoperineal resection of the rectum in another before hospital admission in Brisbane and confirmation of the diagnosis of amoebiasis. Five of the patients with amoebic liver abscess underwent laparotomy soon after admission because of upper abdominal symptoms and signs which resembled those of other surgical conditions. Although the indirect haemagglutination test was of considerable assistance in diagnosing amoebiasis, it was apparent that attention to detail in the collection and examination of faecal specimens remained of major importance. A trial of metronidazole, which is both effective and relatively safe, is advocated in cases of diagnostic difficulty, when amoebiasis is suspected but unproven, and when the adoption of an alternative diagnosis would lead to the initiation of less satisfactory drug therapy or involve otherwise unnecessary surgery.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Created: Tue, 26 Jul 2016, 15:21:59 EST by System User