Conceptions of Australian Political Thought: A Methodological Critique

Stokes G. (1994) Conceptions of Australian Political Thought: A Methodological Critique. Australian Journal of Political Science, 29 2: 240-258. doi:10.1080/00323269408402292


Author Stokes G.
Title Conceptions of Australian Political Thought: A Methodological Critique
Journal name Australian Journal of Political Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1363-030X
Publication date 1994-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/00323269408402292
Volume 29
Issue 2
Start page 240
End page 258
Total pages 19
Subject 3312 Sociology and Political Science
Abstract This paper takes issue with a number of standard interpretations of Australian political thought and the methods of argument by which they have been reached. It confronts the substantive claims (a) that Australia has produced no significant indigenous political thought, ideology, or ideological conflict, and (b) that which passes for political thought is generally derivative, lacking in originality and inferior. It is argued that such claims are based upon unduly narrow conceptions of political thought and misplaced categories of evaluation. Finally, the paper demonstrates that by expanding our conceptions of political thought beyond that of ‘epic’ or universalist political philosophy, and applying methods of evaluation appropriate to the subject matter, more sensible conclusions can be drawn about the existence and quality of Australian political thought, as well as its place in political life.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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