Hendra virus infection dynamics in the grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) at the southern-most extent of its range: further evidence this species does not readily transmit the virus to horses

Burroughs, A. L., Durr, P. A., Boyd, V., Graham, K., White, J. R., Todd, S., Barr, J., Smith, I., Baverstock, G., Meers, J., Crameri, G. and Wang, L-F (2016) Hendra virus infection dynamics in the grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) at the southern-most extent of its range: further evidence this species does not readily transmit the virus to horses. PLoS ONE, 11 6: . doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0155252


Author Burroughs, A. L.
Durr, P. A.
Boyd, V.
Graham, K.
White, J. R.
Todd, S.
Barr, J.
Smith, I.
Baverstock, G.
Meers, J.
Crameri, G.
Wang, L-F
Title Hendra virus infection dynamics in the grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) at the southern-most extent of its range: further evidence this species does not readily transmit the virus to horses
Formatted title
Hendra virus infection dynamics in the grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) at the southern-most extent of its range: further evidence this species does not readily transmit the virus to horses
Journal name PLoS ONE   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2016-06-15
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0155252
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 11
Issue 6
Total pages 18
Place of publication San Francisco, CA, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Hendra virus (HeV) is an important emergent virus in Australia known to infect horses and humans in certain regions of the east coast. Whilst pteropid bats ("flying foxes") are considered the natural reservoir of HeV, which of the four mainland species is the principal reservoir has been a source of ongoing debate, particularly as shared roosting is common. To help resolve this, we sampled a colony consisting of just one of these species, the greyheaded flying fox, (Pteropus poliocephalus), at the southernmost extent of its range. Using the pooled urine sampling technique at approximately weekly intervals over a two year period, we determined the prevalence of HeV and related paramyxoviruses using a novel multiplex (Luminex) platform. Whilst all the pooled urine samples were negative for HeV nucleic acid, we successfully identified four other paramyxoviruses, including Cedar virus; a henipavirus closely related to HeV. Collection of serum from individually caught bats from the colony showed that antibodies to HeV, as estimated by a serological Luminex assay, were present in between 14.6% and 44.5% of animals. The wide range of the estimate reflects uncertainties in interpreting intermediate results. Interpreting the study in the context of HeV studies from states to the north, we add support for an arising consensus that it is the black flying fox and not the grey-headed flying fox that is the principal source of HeV in spillover events to horses.
Keyword Hendra virus (HeV)
Emergent virus
Pteropus poliocephalus
Urine sampling technique
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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