Phylogeny, evolution and historical zoogeography of ticks: a review of recent progress

Barker, Stephen C. and Murrell, Anna (2002) Phylogeny, evolution and historical zoogeography of ticks: a review of recent progress. Experimental And Applied Acarology, 28 1-4: Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens. Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens: 55-68. doi:10.1023/A:1025333830086


Author Barker, Stephen C.
Murrell, Anna
Title Phylogeny, evolution and historical zoogeography of ticks: a review of recent progress
Journal name Experimental And Applied Acarology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0168-8162
1572-9702
Publication date 2002-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1023/A:1025333830086
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 28
Issue 1-4: Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens. Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens
Start page 55
End page 68
Total pages 14
Editor Frans Jongejan
W. Reuben Kaufman
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract There has been much progress in our understanding of the phylogeny and evolution of ticks, particularly hard ticks, in the past 5 years. Indeed, a consensus about the phylogeny of the hard ticks has emerged. Our current working hypothesis for the phylogeny of ticks is quite different to the working hypothesis of 5 years ago. So that the classification reflects our knowledge of ticks, several changes to the nomenclature of ticks are imminent. One subfamily, the Hyalomminae, will probably be sunk, yet another, the Bothriocrotoninae n. subfamily, will be created. Bothriocrotoninae n. subfamily, and Bothriocroton n. genus, are being created to house an early-diverging ('basal') lineage of endemic Australian ticks that used to be in the genus Aponomma (ticks of reptiles). There has been progress in our understanding of the subfamily Rhipicephalinae. The genus Rhipicephalus is almost certainly paraphyletic with respect to the genus Boophilus. Thus, the genus Boophilus will probably become a subgenus of Rhipicephalus. This change to the nomenclature, unlike other options, will keep the name Boophilus in common usage. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus may still called B. microplus, and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus may still be called B. annulatus, but the nomenclature will have been changed to reflect our knowledge of the phylogeny and evolution of these ticks. New insights into the historical zoogeography of ticks will also be presented.
Keyword Entomology
Ixodida
Ticks
Phylogeny
Evolution
Ixodes-scapularis Acari
Eastern North-america
16s Rdna Sequences
Rna Gene-sequences
Ribosomal Dna
Mitochondrial 12s
Hard Ticks
Systematic Relationships
Rhipicephaline Ticks
Boophilus-microplus
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 23:45:05 EST