Fatal and nonfatal accidents on the railways-a study of injuries to individuals. with particular reference to children and to nonfatal trauma

Nixon J., Corcoran A., Fielding L. and Eastgate J. (1985) Fatal and nonfatal accidents on the railways-a study of injuries to individuals. with particular reference to children and to nonfatal trauma. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 17 3: 217-222. doi:10.1016/0001-4575(85)90054-5


Author Nixon J.
Corcoran A.
Fielding L.
Eastgate J.
Title Fatal and nonfatal accidents on the railways-a study of injuries to individuals. with particular reference to children and to nonfatal trauma
Journal name Accident Analysis and Prevention   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0001-4575
Publication date 1985-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/0001-4575(85)90054-5
Volume 17
Issue 3
Start page 217
End page 222
Total pages 6
Subject 1504 Commercial Services
2213 Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
3307 Human Factors and Ergonomics
3308 Law
3311 Safety Research
3313 Transportation
Abstract This paper reports a five-year total population study of fatal railroad accidents involving individuals (that is, not including train crashes or derailments); and a consecutive unselected series of nonfatal isolated injuries in Queensland, Australia. There were 84 fatalities and 211 cases of significant nonfatal traumata. Fatal railway accidents involving children under 15 years of age are now more common in Australia than childhood poisonings and electrocutions. Two syndromes occur-(a) toddlers living near the tracks who simply wander onto the line; and (b) young teenage boys who are run down on level crossings, either as pedestrians or cyclists. Adult fatalities include (a) occupational deaths among railway workers (20%), (b) car-train collisions at level crossings (19%), (c) drunk pedestrians who walk into trains (17%), suicides (12%), and old folk who walk into trains (12%). Of 211 nonfatal cases studied, falls in and from both moving and stationary trains were the most common type of accident. Sudden jolting of the train (probably unpreventable) contributed to 26% of all falls. Twentytwo percent of nonfatal accidents resulted from a person being struck by a train. All persons who survived being struck by a train received serious injuries and required hospital admission. Fatalities involving adults include a high proportion of suicides. Some accidents, such as fingers being caught in windows and doors, can and are being overcome through improved design.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 14 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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