Ascaridoid Nématodes of South American mammals, with a definition of a new genus

Sprent J.F.A. (1982) Ascaridoid Nématodes of South American mammals, with a definition of a new genus. Journal of Helminthology, 56 3: 275-295. doi:10.1017/S0022149X00034659


Author Sprent J.F.A.
Title Ascaridoid Nématodes of South American mammals, with a definition of a new genus
Journal name Journal of Helminthology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1475-2697
Publication date 1982-01-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1017/S0022149X00034659
Volume 56
Issue 3
Start page 275
End page 295
Total pages 21
Subject 2405 Parasitology
1103 Clinical Sciences
Abstract Ascaridoid Nématodes occurring in South American mammals are divided into categories based on their possible origin. The affinities are discussed of five species so far known only from the Neotropical Region. Toxocara alienata (Rudolphi, 1819) is reported from Nasua rufa socialis, Procyon cancrivorus, and Tayassus torquatus. The specimens from T. torquatus are described and found most closely to resemble Toxocara mackerrasae from south-east Asian and Australian rodents. Anisakis insignis from Inia geojfrensis is transferred back to Peritrachelius Diesing, 1851, on account of the structure of the lips and spicules. P. insignis is shown to exhibit remarkable convergence of lip structure with Lagochilascaris turgida from Didelphis marsupialis. Galeiceps longispiculum (Freitas & Lent, 1941) from Pteronura brasiliensis is confirmed as a species distinct from G. cucullus (Linstow, 1899) and G. spinicollis (Baylis, 1923), but G. simiae (Mosgovoy, 1951) is considered to be a synonym of G. spinicollis. An error in the host record of G. spinicollis is corrected from Cercopithecus leucampyx kandti to Lutra maculicollis kivuana. Ascaris dasypodina Baylis, 1922 from armadillos, including Cabassous unicinctus and Tolypeutes matacos, is redescribed and placed in a new genus Bairdascaris. The question is raised as to whether some species in Lagochilascaris, Galeiceps, and Toxocara may have crossed directly by sea from Africa to South America, rather than entering via North America.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: Scopus Import
 
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