Political power, national identity, and language: The case of Afrikaans

Louw P.E. (2004) Political power, national identity, and language: The case of Afrikaans. International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 170: 43-58.

Author Louw P.E.
Title Political power, national identity, and language: The case of Afrikaans
Journal name International Journal of the Sociology of Language   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0165-2516
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Issue 170
Start page 43
End page 58
Total pages 16
Subject 1203 Design Practice and Management
3310 Linguistics and Language
Abstract Afrikaans is the home language of 5.9 million people. During the 1980s, Afrikaans was the dominant state language and a widely-used lingua franca in South Africa and Namibia. But by the end of the twentieth century, English had replaced Afrikaans as the dominant state language and a decline in the use of Afrikaans was in evidence, even among native Afrikaans speakers. An examination of this language's twentieth-century journey helps illustrate the relationship (s) between political power, national identity, and the growth and / or decline of languages.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 11 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 05 Jul 2016, 11:19:44 EST by System User