Body mass index and waist circumference as predictors of all-cause mortality in an Aboriginal Australian community

Adegbija, Odewumi, Hoy, Wendy E., Dong, Bin and Wang, Zhiqiang (2017) Body mass index and waist circumference as predictors of all-cause mortality in an Aboriginal Australian community. Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 11 1: 19-26. doi:10.1016/j.orcp.2016.06.003


Author Adegbija, Odewumi
Hoy, Wendy E.
Dong, Bin
Wang, Zhiqiang
Title Body mass index and waist circumference as predictors of all-cause mortality in an Aboriginal Australian community
Journal name Obesity Research and Clinical Practice   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1871-403X
1878-0318
Publication date 2017-01-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2016.06.003
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 11
Issue 1
Start page 19
End page 26
Total pages 8
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Objective: Although elevated body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) have been identified as risk factors for mortality, data from the Australian Aboriginal communities are scarce. This study examined the associations of BMI and WC with all-cause mortality in an Australian Aboriginal community.
Formatted abstract
Objective

Although elevated body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) have been identified as risk factors for mortality, data from the Australian Aboriginal communities are scarce. This study examined the associations of BMI and WC with all-cause mortality in an Australian Aboriginal community.

Methods

A total of 934 Aboriginal adults, aged 18–76 years, who participated in a community-wide screening programme in Australia's Northern Territory from 1992 to 1998, were followed-up prospectively for up to 18 years for death outcomes. The hazard ratios for mortality were estimated by baseline BMI and WC. Age, sex, smoking and alcohol consumption status were adjusted for in multivariable analysis.

Results

In 14,750 person-years of follow-up, 216 deaths were recorded. For each standard deviation increase in BMI, the risk of all-cause death decreased by 9% (95% CI: 0.80–1.05); whereas for each SD increase in WC, the risk of all-cause mortality increased by 17% (95% CI: 1.03–1.33). The risk of mortality was lower in the 3rd BMI tertile compared to the 1st tertile for mortality after adjusting for WC, age, sex, smoking and alcohol consumption. Risk of death was higher in WC tertile 3 compared to tertile 1 after adjusting for BMI, age, sex, smoking and alcohol consumption.

Conclusions

The risk of all-cause mortality among participants increased with higher WC, while participants with relatively higher BMI had a lower mortality risk. WC had stronger association with mortality than did BMI. The results indicate the importance of assessing WC measures in studies conducted in Aboriginal Australia.
Keyword Body mass index
Waist circumference
All-cause mortality
Aboriginal people
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID APP1025350
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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Created: Thu, 30 Jun 2016, 19:41:15 EST by Bin Dong on behalf of Medicine - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital