Australian spiny mountain crayfish and their temnocephalan ectosymbionts: an ancient association on the edge of coextinction?

Hoyal Cuthill, Jennifer F., Sewell, Kim B., Cannon, Lester R. G., Charleston, Michael A., Lawler, Susan, Littlewood, D. Timothy J., Olson, Peter D. and Blair, David (2016) Australian spiny mountain crayfish and their temnocephalan ectosymbionts: an ancient association on the edge of coextinction?. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 283 1831: 20160585.1-20160585.10. doi:10.1098/rspb.2016.0585


Author Hoyal Cuthill, Jennifer F.
Sewell, Kim B.
Cannon, Lester R. G.
Charleston, Michael A.
Lawler, Susan
Littlewood, D. Timothy J.
Olson, Peter D.
Blair, David
Title Australian spiny mountain crayfish and their temnocephalan ectosymbionts: an ancient association on the edge of coextinction?
Journal name Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-8452
1471-2954
Publication date 2016-05-25
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2016.0585
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 283
Issue 1831
Start page 20160585.1
End page 20160585.10
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Australian spiny mountain crayfish (Euastacus, Parastacidae) and their ecotosymbiotic temnocephalan flatworms (Temnocephalida, Platyhelminthes) may have co-occurred and interacted through deep time, during a period of major environmental change. Therefore, reconstructing the history of their association is of evolutionary, ecological, and conservation significance. Here, time-calibrated Bayesian phylogenies of Euastacus species and their temnocephalans (Temnohaswellia and Temnosewellia) indicate nearsynchronous diversifications from the Cretaceous. Statistically significant cophylogeny correlations between associated clades suggest linked evolutionary histories. However, there is a stronger signal of codivergence and greater host specificity in Temnosewellia, which co-occurs with Euastacus across its range. Phylogeography and analyses of evolutionary distinctiveness (ED) suggest that regional differences in the impact of climate warming and drying had major effects both on crayfish and associated temnocephalans. In particular, Euastacus and Temnosewellia show strong latitudinal gradients in ED and, conversely, in geographical range size, with the most distinctive, northern lineages facing the greatest risk of extinction. Therefore, environmental change has, in some cases, strengthened ecological and evolutionary associations, leaving host-specific temnocephalans vulnerable to coextinction with endangered hosts. Consequently, the extinction of all Euastacus species currently endangered (75%) predicts coextinction of approximately 60% of the studied temnocephalans, with greatest loss of the most evolutionarily distinctive lineages.
Keyword Invertebrates
Phylogenetics
Cophylogeny
Symbionts
Parasites
Climate change
Conservation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 29 Jun 2016, 23:58:59 EST by Kim Sewell on behalf of Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis