Examining the influence of biological and psychological factors on cognitive performance in chronic fatigue syndrome: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study

Smith, S and Sullivan, K (2003) Examining the influence of biological and psychological factors on cognitive performance in chronic fatigue syndrome: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 10 2: 162-173. doi:10.1207/S15327558IJBM1002_05


Author Smith, S
Sullivan, K
Title Examining the influence of biological and psychological factors on cognitive performance in chronic fatigue syndrome: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1070-5503
Publication date 2003-01-01
Year available 2003
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1207/S15327558IJBM1002_05
Open Access Status
Volume 10
Issue 2
Start page 162
End page 173
Total pages 12
Place of publication Mahwah
Publisher Lawrence Erlbaum Assoc Inc
Language eng
Abstract The pathophysiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) remains unclear; however, both biological and psychological factors have been implicated in establishing or maintaining this condition. People with CFS report significant and disabling cognitive difficulties such as impaired concentration that in some cases are exacerbated by exposure to chemical triggers. The aim of this study was to determine if neuropsychological deficits in CFS are triggered by exposure to chemicals, or perceptions about the properties of these substances. Participants were 36 people with a primary diagnosis of CFS, defined according to Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design was used, with objective assessment of neuropsychological function and participant rating of substance type, before and after exposure to placebo or chemical trigger. Results showed decrements in neuropsychological tests scores on three out of four outcome measures when participants rated the substance they had been exposed to as chemical. No change in performance was found based on actual substance type. These results suggest that cognitive attributions about exposure substances in people with CFS may be associated with worse performance on neuropsychological tasks. In addition, these findings suggest that psychological interventions aimed at modifying substance-related cognitions may reduce some symptoms of CFS.
Keyword Psychology, Clinical
Chemical-sensitivity
Chamber Challenges
Provocation
Memory
Abnormalities
Exposure
Deficits
Tests
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 23:36:24 EST