Growth and Yield of Rice Cultivars Under Sprinkler Irrigation in South-Eastern Queensland. 3. Water Extraction and Plant Water Relations — Comparison with Maize and Grain Sorghum

Fukai S. and Inthapan P. (1988) Growth and Yield of Rice Cultivars Under Sprinkler Irrigation in South-Eastern Queensland. 3. Water Extraction and Plant Water Relations — Comparison with Maize and Grain Sorghum. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture, 28 2: 249-252. doi:10.1071/EA9880249


Author Fukai S.
Inthapan P.
Title Growth and Yield of Rice Cultivars Under Sprinkler Irrigation in South-Eastern Queensland. 3. Water Extraction and Plant Water Relations — Comparison with Maize and Grain Sorghum
Journal name Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0816-1089
Publication date 1988-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/EA9880249
Volume 28
Issue 2
Start page 249
End page 252
Total pages 4
Subject 1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Abstract Several physiological responses were compared, under irrigated and water-stressed conditions, in an attempt to explain the reasons for the greater reduction in dry matter production of rice compared with maize and sorghum in a water-limiting environment. Leaf water potential and leaf rolling were determined weekly, soil water profiles and root length density twice, and leaf osmotic potential once during a long dry period. Root length density of rice was at least as high as that of maize and sorghum in the top 0·6 m layer of soil in both the wet and dry trials. There was no difference in water extraction among the 3 species from this layer, while rice extracted less water than did the other species from below 0·6 m. High variability among replicates precluded any conclusion being drawn regarding root length in the deeper layer. Leaf water potential, measured in the early afternoon, was consistently lower in rice than in maize and sorghum, even when soil water content was high, indicating high internal resistance to the flow of water in the rice plants. The low leaf water potential in rice was accompanied by low osmotic potential, and this assisted in maintenance of turgor and dry matter growth when soil water content was relatively high. As soil water content decreased, however, leaf water potential became very low (less than − 2·5 MPa) and, for rice, leaves rolled tightly.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 28 Jun 2016, 15:53:43 EST by System User