Radiation degradation of copolymers of ethylene and α-olefins: The temperature dependence of yields of volatile products

Bowmer T.N., Ho S.-Y. and O'Donnell J.H. (1983) Radiation degradation of copolymers of ethylene and α-olefins: The temperature dependence of yields of volatile products. Polymer Degradation and Stability, 5 6: 449-456. doi:10.1016/0141-3910(83)90026-5


Author Bowmer T.N.
Ho S.-Y.
O'Donnell J.H.
Title Radiation degradation of copolymers of ethylene and α-olefins: The temperature dependence of yields of volatile products
Journal name Polymer Degradation and Stability   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0141-3910
Publication date 1983-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/0141-3910(83)90026-5
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 5
Issue 6
Start page 449
End page 456
Total pages 8
Subject 1605 Policy and Administration
2507 Polymers and Plastics
Abstract γ-Irradiation of polyolefins produces small amounts of volatile hydrocarbons. Their yields have been measured for irradiation of homopolymers of ethylene and copolymers with propene, 1-butene and 1-hexene at temperatures from 30 to 175°C. The alkane distribution was characteristic for each type of polymer, and dependent on the frequency of the alkyl substituents. The distribution for a particular polymer was similar at all temperatures, although the yields of alkanes increased rapidly above 100°C. The yields of alkenes, which were mainly ethylene and butene, increased proportionately more rapidly from almost nil at 30°C. The ethylene yields from all the polymers fitted a common Arrhenius relationship with an activation energy of 40 kJ mol-1 and are attributed to radiation-induced thermal depolymerization. Detection of alkyl short branches in polyolefins is more sensitive at higher temperatures, but corrections for radiation-induced thermal degradation are more significant, whereas morphological differences can apparently affect the radiation sensitivities at 30°C.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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