Collecting food-related data from low socioeconomic groups: How adequate are our current research designs?

Turrell G. and Najman J.M. (1995) Collecting food-related data from low socioeconomic groups: How adequate are our current research designs?. Australian Journal of Public Health, 19 4: 410-416.

Author Turrell G.
Najman J.M.
Title Collecting food-related data from low socioeconomic groups: How adequate are our current research designs?
Journal name Australian Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1035-7319
Publication date 1995-01-01
Year available 1995
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 19
Issue 4
Start page 410
End page 416
Total pages 7
Place of publication CANBERRA
Publisher PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOC
Language eng
Subject 2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Abstract Australian researchers examining the relationship between socioeconomic status and food-related behaviour have often selected their samples from the electoral roll and then collected their data using a mail-survey method. These studies have generally found statistically significant associations between socioeconomic status and behaviour although these relationships are usually only weak-to-moderate in strength. Given the consistent and strong pattern of association between socioeconomic status and mortality, and diet acid mortality, there is a possibility that these studies may have used a research design that underestimates the magnitude of the association, To assess this possibility, results obtained using an electoral-roll sample and mail-survey method were compared with findings obtained by administering the same questionnaire directly to a sample of indigent clients contacted through a welfare agency. The comparison suggests that studies that draw their samples from electoral rails and then collect data using a mail-survey questionnaire may greatly understate the level of socioeconomic inequality in food-related behaviour in the wider community.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 28 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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