A qualitative study of Australian GPs' attitudes and practices in the diagnosis and management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Shaw, K., Wagner, I., Eastwood, H. and Mitchell, Geoffrey K. (2003) A qualitative study of Australian GPs' attitudes and practices in the diagnosis and management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Family Practice, 20 2: 129-134. doi:10.1093/fampra/20.2.129


Author Shaw, K.
Wagner, I.
Eastwood, H.
Mitchell, Geoffrey K.
Title A qualitative study of Australian GPs' attitudes and practices in the diagnosis and management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
Journal name Family Practice   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0263-2136
Publication date 2003-04-01
Year available 2003
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/fampra/20.2.129
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 20
Issue 2
Start page 129
End page 134
Total pages 6
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Oxford Univ Press
Language eng
Subject 320000 Medical and Health Sciences
321200 Public Health and Health Services
Abstract Background. The importance of general practice involvement in the care of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is increasing due to the rising numbers of patients who present with the disorder. It has been suggested by consensus bodies that GPs should be identifying and referring patients at the severe end of the ADHD spectrum and managing those with less severe symptoms. However, GPs' views of their role in ADHD care are unknown. Objective. Our aim was to explore the attitudes and practices of Australian GPs towards the diagnosis and management of ADHD. Methods. We conducted a series of focus groups to explore GPs' beliefs regarding the causes of ADHD, their perceived role in ADHD diagnosis and management and their views on the role of behaviour therapies and pharmacotherapies in ADHD management. The subjects were 28 GPs in six focus groups. Results. GPs in this study did not want to be the primary providers of care for patients with ADHD. Participants indicated a preference to refer the patient to medical specialists for diagnosis and treatment of ADHD, and expressed low levels of interest in becoming highly involved in ADHD care. Concerns about overdiagnosis and misdiagnosis of the disorder, diagnostic complexity, time constraints, insufficient education and training about the disorder, and concerns regarding misuse and diversion of stimulant medications were the reasons cited for their lack of willingness. Conclusions. The Australian GPs in this study identify a role for themselves in ADHD care which is largely supportive in nature, and involves close liaison with specialist services.
Keyword Medicine, General & Internal
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder
General Practice
Qualitative
Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Children
Conduct
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 21 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 23:32:55 EST