Plausibility and the construal of grammatical relations in illocutionary sentences by deaf and hearing children.

Dalgleish B.W.J. (1979) Plausibility and the construal of grammatical relations in illocutionary sentences by deaf and hearing children.. The Exceptional Child, 26 3: 127-132. doi:10.1080/0156655790260304


Author Dalgleish B.W.J.
Title Plausibility and the construal of grammatical relations in illocutionary sentences by deaf and hearing children.
Journal name The Exceptional Child
ISSN 0156-6555
Publication date 1979-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/0156655790260304
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 26
Issue 3
Start page 127
End page 132
Total pages 6
Subject 3204 Developmental and Educational Psychology
3306 Health (social science)
3304 Education
3601 Health Professions (miscellaneous)
Abstract Groups of deaf and hearing children who had not fully mastered the rules for the assignment of the subject of the dependent verb for sentences of the form: Noun Phrasej (NP1) + Illocutionary Verb + Noun Phrase 2 (NP2) + to + Infinitive Verb were tested for the influence of four kinds of plausibility cues. In three sets the social power relations holding between the occupants of the respective NP's were used to construct plausible, neutral and implausible frames as judged by the tendency to construe NP2 as the subject of the dependent verb. In the fourth, implausible verb (IV), the dependent verb referred to an action difficult for others to control, and so was neutral for regular illocutionary verbs requiring NP2 as subject, but positive for NP1 construals appropriate to the irregular illocutionary verb, promise. The hearing children proved sensitive to the plausibility cues, showing much larger differences in success with the regular and exceptional verb for the plausible than for the implausible.set, with the neutral and IV sets occupying intervening positions. Deaf children did not respond to the plausibility variable. It was concluded that although it had been demonstrated that the referential meaning of individual words can influence the construal of meaning of word combinations, the strategy might not be successful with the deaf unless preceded by further training in the denotative and connotative meanings of individual words.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Created: Tue, 28 Jun 2016, 11:55:26 EST by System User