Timing of return to work and breastfeeding in Australia

Xiang, Ning, Zadoroznyj, Maria, Tomaszewski, Wojtek and Martin, Bill (2016) Timing of return to work and breastfeeding in Australia. Pediatrics, 137 6: . doi:10.1542/peds.2015-3883


Author Xiang, Ning
Zadoroznyj, Maria
Tomaszewski, Wojtek
Martin, Bill
Title Timing of return to work and breastfeeding in Australia
Journal name Pediatrics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0031-4005
1098-4275
Publication date 2016-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1542/peds.2015-3883
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 137
Issue 6
Total pages 9
Place of publication Elk Grove Village, IL, United States
Publisher American Academy of Pediatrics
Language eng
Formatted abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of timing of return to work, number of hours worked, and their interaction, on the likelihood of breastfeeding at 6 months and predominant breastfeeding at 16 weeks.

METHODS: A nationally representative sample of Australian mothers in paid employment in the 13 months before giving birth (n = 2300) were surveyed by telephone. Four multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyze the effects of timing of return to work and work hours, independently and in interaction, on any breastfeeding at 6 months and on predominant breastfeeding at 16 weeks, controlling for maternal sociodemographics, employment patterns, and health measures.

RESULTS: Mothers who returned to work within 6 months and who worked for ≥20 hours per week were significantly less likely than mothers who had not returned to work to be breastfeeding at 6 months. However, returning to work for ≤19 hours per week had no significant impact on the likelihood of breastfeeding regardless of when mothers returned to work. Older maternal age, higher educational attainment, better physical or mental health, managerial or professional maternal occupation, and being self-employed all significantly contributed to the increased likelihood of any breastfeeding at 6 months. Similar patterns exist for predominant breastfeeding at 16 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS: The effects of timing of return to work are secondary to the hours of employment. Working ≤19 hours per week is associated with higher likelihood of maintaining breastfeeding, regardless of timing of return to work.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
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Created: Fri, 17 Jun 2016, 23:35:59 EST by Dr Wojtek Tomaszewski on behalf of Institute for Social Science Research