Factors controlling the leaching of major and minor constituents from processed rundle oil shale

Bell P.R.F., Krol A.A. and Greenfield P.F. (1986) Factors controlling the leaching of major and minor constituents from processed rundle oil shale. Water Research, 20 6: 741-750. doi:10.1016/0043-1354(86)90098-9


Author Bell P.R.F.
Krol A.A.
Greenfield P.F.
Title Factors controlling the leaching of major and minor constituents from processed rundle oil shale
Journal name Water Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0043-1354
Publication date 1986-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/0043-1354(86)90098-9
Volume 20
Issue 6
Start page 741
End page 750
Total pages 10
Subject 1904 Performing Arts and Creative Writing
Abstract The chemical characteristics of leachates from columns of processed oil shale from the Rundle resource, Queensland, were determined and the factors controlling the rate of release of the major and minor constitutents were delineated. The studies were carried out in two types of laboratory columns and a weathering column (lysimeter) exposed to prevailing weather conditions. The flow in the laboratory columns was maintained in an unsaturated mode in order to simulate the flow conditions found in the field. The major constitutents leached from Rundle spent shale are the sulphates and chlorides of Ca, Mg, K and Na. Most of these salts are eluted in the first few pore volumes of leachate. The only major constituents significantly constrained by solubility factors are Ca and SO4, this being due to solution saturation with respect to gypsum (CaSO4 · 2H2O). Chemical equilibria with respect to the ion pairs CaSO4 o and MgSO4 o are important in determining the rate of release of Ca, Mg and SO4. Ion exchange and sorption phenomena are significant in controlling the leaching rate of both the major cationic metal species and the minor (or trace) elements. Many of these minor elements are probably in the anionic form (e.g. As, Se and V), yet are still absorbed by the shale which exhibits no significant anion exchange capacity. Weathering reactions appear to play a significant role in the continued slow leaching of the major and minor species which is observed even after many pore volumes of liquid have eluted.
Keyword anion exchange
cation exchange
chemical equilibria
leachate
lysimeter
oil shale
Rundle
spent shale
trace elements
weathering
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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