The Productivity of Angora Goats Grazing Improved and Native Pastures in South-Eastern Queensland

Norton B.W. and Deery M.J. (1985) The Productivity of Angora Goats Grazing Improved and Native Pastures in South-Eastern Queensland. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture, 25 1: 35-40. doi:10.1071/EA9850035


Author Norton B.W.
Deery M.J.
Title The Productivity of Angora Goats Grazing Improved and Native Pastures in South-Eastern Queensland
Journal name Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0816-1089
Publication date 1985-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/EA9850035
Open Access Status
Volume 25
Issue 1
Start page 35
End page 40
Total pages 6
Subject 1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Abstract Two groups of Angora wether goats were grazed over 1 year on replicated areas (0.4 ha each) of either pure N-fertilized Pangóla grass (Digitarla decumbens Stent.) pasture or native pastures containing Acacia, Eucalyptus and groundsel (Baccharis halimfolia L.) regrowth. Half of the goats in each group were given a cobalt bullet and their health, liveweight change and fleece growth were monitored. When adequate levels of native pasture were available (>800 kg green matter/ha) performance of goats on the different pastures was similar over the spring and summer grazing periods. In the winter period, fleece growth rate and yield were significantly (P<0 05) lower and liveweight loss (11 g/day) occurred in goats grazing native pastures. In the same period, goats on Pangóla grass pastures supplemented with cobalt continued to grow (39 g/day) and maintained high fleece yields while unsupplemented goats on the same area lost weight rapidly (84 g/day), indicating the onset of cobalt deficiency. Over a 9-month period, the population of regrowth acacias and eucalypts less than 1.5 m high were markedly reduced, and groundsel was completely eliminated from the area. In this period, the palatable native grasses were selected in preference to blady grass (Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.), which increased as a proportion of declining total grass yield.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import - Archived
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Jun 2016, 15:15:28 EST by System User