Discovery, structure, function, and applications of cyclotides: circular proteins from plants

Weidmann, Joachim and Craik, David J. (2016) Discovery, structure, function, and applications of cyclotides: circular proteins from plants. Journal of Experimental Botany, 67 16: 4801-4812. doi:10.1093/jxb/erw210


Author Weidmann, Joachim
Craik, David J.
Title Discovery, structure, function, and applications of cyclotides: circular proteins from plants
Journal name Journal of Experimental Botany   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0957
1460-2431
Publication date 2016-05-23
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/jxb/erw210
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 67
Issue 16
Start page 4801
End page 4812
Total pages 12
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject 1314 Physiology
1110 Plant Science
Abstract Cyclotides are plant-derived cyclic peptides that have a head-to-tail cyclic backbone and three conserved disulphide bonds that form a cyclic cystine knot motif. They occur in plants from the Violaceae, Rubiaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae, and Solanaceae families, typically with 10-100 cyclotides in a given plant species, in a wide range of tissues, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots. Some cyclotides are expressed in large amounts (up to 1g kg wet plant weight) and their natural function appears to be to protect plants from pests or pathogens. This article provides a brief overview of their discovery, distribution in plants, and applications. In particular, their exceptional stability has led to their use as peptide-based scaffolds in drug design applications. They also have potential as natural 'ecofriendly' insecticides, and as protein engineering frameworks.
Formatted abstract
Cyclotides are plant-derived cyclic peptides that have a head-to-tail cyclic backbone and three conserved disulphide bonds that form a cyclic cystine knot motif. They occur in plants from the Violaceae, Rubiaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae, and Solanaceae families, typically with 10–100 cyclotides in a given plant species, in a wide range of tissues, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots. Some cyclotides are expressed in large amounts (up to 1g kg–1 wet plant weight) and their natural function appears to be to protect plants from pests or pathogens. This article provides a brief overview of their discovery, distribution in plants, and applications. In particular, their exceptional stability has led to their use as peptide-based scaffolds in drug design applications. They also have potential as natural ‘ecofriendly’ insecticides, and as protein engineering frameworks.
Keyword Plant Sciences
Plant Sciences
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID DP150100443
APP1084965
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 08 Jun 2016, 01:11:32 EST by Susan Allen on behalf of Institute for Molecular Bioscience