The Pleistocene prehistory of the Lake Victoria basin

Tryon, Christian A., Faith, J. Tyler, Peppe, Daniel J., Beverly, Emily J., Blegen, Nick, Blumenthal, Scott A., Chritz, Kendra L., Driese, Steven G., Patterson, David and Sharp, Warren D. (2016) The Pleistocene prehistory of the Lake Victoria basin. Quaternary International, 404 100-114. doi:10.1016/j.quaint.2015.11.073


Author Tryon, Christian A.
Faith, J. Tyler
Peppe, Daniel J.
Beverly, Emily J.
Blegen, Nick
Blumenthal, Scott A.
Chritz, Kendra L.
Driese, Steven G.
Patterson, David
Sharp, Warren D.
Title The Pleistocene prehistory of the Lake Victoria basin
Journal name Quaternary International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1040-6182
1873-4553
Publication date 2016-06-06
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.quaint.2015.11.073
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 404
Start page 100
End page 114
Total pages 15
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Language eng
Subject 1904 Earth-Surface Processes
Abstract Late Pleistocene sedimentary, biogeochemical, and fossil data from the Lake Victoria basin (the largest lake in Africa) suggest that its reduction or desiccation during periods of increased aridity repeatedly facilitated the dispersal of C grassland ecosystems across the basin. Archaeological evidence from Middle Stone Age and Later Stone Age sites suggest that human groups diffused into the basin during intervals of declining lake levels, likely tracking the movement of the dense and predictable resources of shoreline environments, as well as the dense but less predictable C grass grazing herbivores. Repeated cycles of lake expansion and contraction provide a push-pull mechanism for the isolation and combination of populations in Equatorial Africa that may contribute to the Late Pleistocene human biological variability suggested by the fossil and genetic records. Latitudinal differences in the timing of environmental change between the Lake Victoria basin and surrounding regions may have promoted movements across, within, and possibly out of Africa.
Formatted abstract
Late Pleistocene sedimentary, biogeochemical, and fossil data from the Lake Victoria basin (the largest lake in Africa) suggest that its reduction or desiccation during periods of increased aridity repeatedly facilitated the dispersal of C4 grassland ecosystems across the basin. Archaeological evidence from Middle Stone Age and Later Stone Age sites suggest that human groups diffused into the basin during intervals of declining lake levels, likely tracking the movement of the dense and predictable resources of shoreline environments, as well as the dense but less predictable C4 grass grazing herbivores. Repeated cycles of lake expansion and contraction provide a push–pull mechanism for the isolation and combination of populations in Equatorial Africa that may contribute to the Late Pleistocene human biological variability suggested by the fossil and genetic records. Latitudinal differences in the timing of environmental change between the Lake Victoria basin and surrounding regions may have promoted movements across, within, and possibly out of Africa.
Keyword Human dispersals
Later Stone Age
Middle Stone Age
Paleoenvironment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID BCS 1013108
BCS-1013199
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 06 Jun 2016, 20:18:22 EST by Tyler Faith on behalf of School of Social Science