Return to sport matters — longer-term quality of life after ACL reconstruction in people with knee difficulties

Filbay, S. R., Ackerman, I. N., Russell, T. G. and Crossley, K. M. (2016) Return to sport matters — longer-term quality of life after ACL reconstruction in people with knee difficulties. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 27 5: 514-524. doi:10.1111/sms.12698


Author Filbay, S. R.
Ackerman, I. N.
Russell, T. G.
Crossley, K. M.
Title Return to sport matters — longer-term quality of life after ACL reconstruction in people with knee difficulties
Journal name Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1600-0838
0905-7188
Publication date 2016-05-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/sms.12698
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 27
Issue 5
Start page 514
End page 524
Total pages 11
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract Many individuals experience long-term quality of life (QOL) impairment following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Factors contributing to poor QOL and psychological health >5 years after ACLR remain unclear. This study aimed to describe QOL and psychological health outcomes in people with knee difficulties (pain, symptoms, or functional limitations) 5-20 years following ACLR and identify factors explaining variability in these outcomes. Participants with knee difficulties 5-20 years following ACLR completed a battery of validated patient-reported outcomes [including the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), ACL-QOL, and the Assessment of QOL (AQoL-8D) instrument]. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify factors explaining variability in outcomes. One hundred sixty-two participants aged 38 ± 9 (mean ± SD) years completed questionnaires 9 ± 4 (range 5-20) years following ACLR. Thirty-nine percent of participants returned to competitive sport, 28% returned to a lower level, and 32% did not return to sport after ACLR. Not returning to sport after ACLR was associated with worse KOOS-QOL (β = 0.29, P = 0.001 [mean ± SD (55 ± 20)], ACL-QOL [β = 0.48, P < 0.001; (57 ± 21)], and AQoL-8D [β = 0.22, P = 0.02 (0.80 ± 0.14)]) scores. Increased body mass index (56% were overweight/obese) was related to worse QOL and more depressive symptoms. Subsequent knee surgery and contralateral ACLR were also associated with poorer QOL outcomes in these individuals.
Formatted abstract
Many individuals experience long-term quality of life (QOL) impairment following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Factors contributing to poor QOL and psychological health >5 years after ACLR remain unclear. This study aimed to describe QOL and psychological health outcomes in people with knee difficulties (pain, symptoms, or functional limitations) 5–20 years following ACLR and identify factors explaining variability in these outcomes. Participants with knee difficulties 5–20 years following ACLR completed a battery of validated patient-reported outcomes [including the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), ACL-QOL, and the Assessment of QOL (AQoL-8D) instrument]. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify factors explaining variability in outcomes. One hundred sixty-two participants aged 38 ± 9 (mean ± SD) years completed questionnaires 9 ± 4 (range 5–20) years following ACLR. Thirty-nine percent of participants returned to competitive sport, 28% returned to a lower level, and 32% did not return to sport after ACLR. Not returning to sport after ACLR was associated with worse KOOS-QOL (β = 0.29, P = 0.001 [mean ± SD (55 ± 20)], ACL-QOL [β = 0.48, P < 0.001; (57 ± 21)], and AQoL-8D [β = 0.22, P = 0.02 (0.80 ± 0.14)]) scores. Increased body mass index (56% were overweight/obese) was related to worse QOL and more depressive symptoms. Subsequent knee surgery and contralateral ACLR were also associated with poorer QOL outcomes in these individuals.
Keyword Anterior cruciate ligament
Arthroscopic surgery
Body mass index
Depression
Pain
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Early view

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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