Dynamic single-leg postural control is impaired bilaterally following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: implications for reinjury risk

Culvenor, Adam G., Alexander, Bryce C., Clark, Ross A., Collins, Natalie J., Ageberg, Eva, Morris, Hayden G., Whitehead, Timothy S. and Crossley, Kay M. (2016) Dynamic single-leg postural control is impaired bilaterally following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: implications for reinjury risk. Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 46 5: 357-364. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6305


Author Culvenor, Adam G.
Alexander, Bryce C.
Clark, Ross A.
Collins, Natalie J.
Ageberg, Eva
Morris, Hayden G.
Whitehead, Timothy S.
Crossley, Kay M.
Title Dynamic single-leg postural control is impaired bilaterally following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: implications for reinjury risk
Journal name Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0190-6011
1938-1344
Publication date 2016-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2016.6305
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 46
Issue 5
Start page 357
End page 364
Total pages 8
Place of publication Alexandria, VA, United States
Publisher American Physical Therapy Association * Orthopedic Section
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Study Design: Cross-sectional, controlled laboratory study.

Background: Postural control following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) primarily has been investigated during static single-leg balance tasks. Lile is known about dynamic postural control deficits post-ACLR. OBJECTIVES: To compare dynamic postural control (bilaterally) in individuals who have undergone ACLR and in healthy controls, and to evaluate the relationship between dynamic postural control and self-reported and objective function.

Methods: Ninety-seven participants (66 male; median age, 28 years) 12 months post-ACLR and 48 healthy controls (20 male; median age, 30 years) underwent balance assessment using a Nintendo Wii Balance Board during a single-leg squat. Centerof- pressure (CoP) path velocity, as well as CoP amplitude and standard deviation, in both mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) directions were recorded. Self-reported function was assessed with the International Knee Documentation Commiee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form (IKDC), while hop for distance was used to evaluate functional status.

Results: Compared to healthy controls, the ACLR group had greater mean CoP path velocity (16% higher, P = .004), ML range (23%, P<.001), ML SD (28%, P<.001), AP range (14%, P = .009), and AP SD (15%, P = .013), indicating worse dynamic balance post-ACLR. Dynamic balance performance was similar between the ACLR limb and the uninjured contralateral limb. The AP SD was weakly associated with hop performance (β = .2, P = .046); no balance measures were associated with IKDC score.

Conclusion: Individuals who have undergone ACLR demonstrate impaired dynamic balance bilaterally when performing a single-leg squat, which may have implications for physical function and future injury risk. Routine dynamic balance assessment may help identify patients who could benefit from targeted neuromuscular training programs to improve objective function and potentially lower reinjury risk.
Keyword Balance
Knee
Lower extremity function
Single-leg squat
Wii Balance Board
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 17 May 2016, 10:37:40 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)