Effect of different repeated-high-intensity-effort bouts on subsequent running, skill performance, and neuromuscular function

Johnston, Rich D., Gabbett, Tim J., Jenkins, David G. and Speranza, Michael J. (2016) Effect of different repeated-high-intensity-effort bouts on subsequent running, skill performance, and neuromuscular function. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 11 3: 311-318. doi:10.1123/ijspp.2015-0243


Author Johnston, Rich D.
Gabbett, Tim J.
Jenkins, David G.
Speranza, Michael J.
Title Effect of different repeated-high-intensity-effort bouts on subsequent running, skill performance, and neuromuscular function
Journal name International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1555-0265
1555-0273
Publication date 2016-04-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2015-0243
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 11
Issue 3
Start page 311
End page 318
Total pages 8
Place of publication Champaign, IL United States
Publisher Human Kinetics
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: To assess the impact of different repeated-high-intensity-effort (RHIE) bouts on player activity profiles, skill involvements, and neuromuscular fatigue during small-sided games. Participants: 22 semiprofessional rugby league players (age 24.0 ± 1.8 y, body mass 95.6 ± 7.4 kg). Methods: During 4 testing sessions, they performed RHIE bouts that each differed in the combination of contact and running efforts, followed by a 5-min off-side small-sided game before performing a second bout of RHIE activity and another 5-min small-sided game. Global positioning system microtechnology and video recordings provided information on activity profiles and skill involvements. A countermovement jump and a plyometric push-up assessed changes in lower- and upper-body neuromuscular function after each session. Results: After running-dominant RHIE bouts, players maintained running intensities during both games. In the contact-dominant RHIE bouts, reductions in moderate-speed activity were observed from game 1 to game 2 (ES = –0.71 to –1.06). There was also moderately lower disposal efficiency across both games after contact-dominant RHIE activity compared with running-dominant activity (ES = 0.62–1.02). Greater reductions in lower-body fatigue occurred as RHIE bouts became more running dominant (ES = –0.01 to –1.36), whereas upper-body fatigue increased as RHIE bouts became more contact dominant (ES = –0.07 to –1.55). Conclusions: Physical contact causes reductions in running intensity and the quality of skill involvements during game-based activities. In addition, the neuromuscular fatigue experienced by players is specific to the activities performed.
Keyword Team sport
Rugby league
Movement demands
Pacing
Global positioning system
Fatigue
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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