American Association of Physical Anthropology

American Association of Physical Anthropology (2010) . American Association of Physical Anthropology, 14-17 April 2010, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States.

Title of proceedings American Association of Physical Anthropology
Conference name American Association of Physical Anthropology
Conference location Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
Conference dates 14-17 April 2010
Publication date 2010
Author Panagiotopoulou O
Cobb SN
Issue number 141
Start page S50
Language eng
Subject 270599 Zoology not elsewhere classified
370301 Biological (Physical) Anthropology
Abstract/Summary Morphological variations in the adult anthropoid mandibular symphysis have been attributed to the high loading regimens elicited during postcanine biting, but none of these biomechanical models have considered the potential influences of developmental constraints on symphyseal morphology during ontogeny. Consistency of the shape of symphyseal morphology and its intimate relationship of incisor crypts in juveniles suggest either that the relative size of the developing incisors influences symphyseal morphology or that biomechanical demands on the symphyseal region constraint the size of the developing incisors during ontogeny. Also the spatial requirements of the developing incisor dentition result in the reduction of the subcortical bone tissue in the symphyseal region, leaving the anterior mandible subcortically hollowed. The effect of the developing incisor crypts-instead of subcortical bone-on the mechanical performance of the juvenile symphysis was tested here using Finite element analysis (FEA) of a juvenile M. fascicularis mandible. FEA results showed a notable increase in strain magnitudes by up to 35% when the developing crypts are present. This suggests that the presence of the developing crypts and associated reduction in subcortical bone tissue has a remarkable effect on the ability of the symphysis to resist bending since a hollowed subcortical symphysis is not as effective at resisting stresses. These results indicate that there is an adaptational balance in symphyseal morphology between the spatial requirements of the developing incisor dentition and the biomechanical functional maintenance during ontogeny. The results of this study also introduce the hypothesis that symphyseal morphology is a primary adaptation to the spatial demands of the developing incisor dentition which is secondarily adapted (exapted) to masticatory biomechanics.

Document type: Conference Proceedings
Collection: School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 07 Apr 2016, 14:20:39 EST by Olga Panagiotopoulou on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences