Moderating effects of social engagement on driving cessation in older women

Pachana, Nancy A., Leung, Janni K., Gardiner, Paul A. and McLaughlin, Deirdre (2016) Moderating effects of social engagement on driving cessation in older women. International Psychogeriatrics, 28 8: 1-8. doi:10.1017/S1041610216000211


Author Pachana, Nancy A.
Leung, Janni K.
Gardiner, Paul A.
McLaughlin, Deirdre
Title Moderating effects of social engagement on driving cessation in older women
Journal name International Psychogeriatrics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1741-203X
1041-6102
Publication date 2016-03-22
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S1041610216000211
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 28
Issue 8
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Subject 3203 Clinical Psychology
2909 Gerontology
2717 Geriatrics and Gerontology
2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
Abstract Background: Driving cessation in later life is associated with depression. This study examines if social support can buffer the negative effects of driving cessation on older women's mental health. Methods: Participants were drawn from the 1921-1926 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) and included 4,075 older women (aged 76-87 years) who drove at baseline, following them for three years to assess driving cessation. The outcome variable was mental health, measured by the mental health index (MHI) of the SF-36. The explanatory variables were social support factors, including social interaction, whether the women were living alone or with others, and engagement in social activities. Control variables included age, country of birth, area of residence, ability to manage on income, marital status, and general health. Results: Main effect results showed that poor mental health was predicted by driving cessation, low levels of social interaction, and non-engagement in social activities. There was a significant interaction effect of driving status by social activities engagement on mental health. Women who remained active in their engagement of social activities were able to maintain a good level of mental health despite driving cessation. Conclusion: Engagement and participation in social activities can help older women who stopped driving maintain a good level of mental health.
Formatted abstract
Background: Driving cessation in later life is associated with depression. This study examines if social support can buffer the negative effects of driving cessation on older women's mental health.

Methods: Participants were drawn from the 1921–1926 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) and included 4,075 older women (aged 76–87 years) who drove at baseline, following them for three years to assess driving cessation. The outcome variable was mental health, measured by the mental health index (MHI) of the SF-36. The explanatory variables were social support factors, including social interaction, whether the women were living alone or with others, and engagement in social activities. Control variables included age, country of birth, area of residence, ability to manage on income, marital status, and general health.

Results: Main effect results showed that poor mental health was predicted by driving cessation, low levels of social interaction, and non-engagement in social activities. There was a significant interaction effect of driving status by social activities engagement on mental health. Women who remained active in their engagement of social activities were able to maintain a good level of mental health despite driving cessation.

Conclusion: Engagement and participation in social activities can help older women who stopped driving maintain a good level of mental health.
Keyword Driving
Mental health
Social engagement
Social support
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 1103311
Institutional Status UQ

 
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