Temporal and spatial patterns of fire incident response time: a case study of residential fires in Brisbane

KC, K., Corcoran, J., Higginson, A. and Chhetri, P. (2015). Temporal and spatial patterns of fire incident response time: a case study of residential fires in Brisbane. In: Paul Burton and Heather Shearer, State of Australian Cities Conference 2015: Refereed Proceedings. State of Australian Cities Conference, Gold Coast, Australia, (). 9-11 December 2015.

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Author KC, K.
Corcoran, J.
Higginson, A.
Chhetri, P.
Title of paper Temporal and spatial patterns of fire incident response time: a case study of residential fires in Brisbane
Conference name State of Australian Cities Conference
Conference location Gold Coast, Australia
Conference dates 9-11 December 2015
Proceedings title State of Australian Cities Conference 2015: Refereed Proceedings
Publisher State of Australian Cities Research Network
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISBN 9781925455038
Editor Paul Burton
Heather Shearer
Total pages 20
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Prompt and timely response to fire incidents is critical for emergency management as delays in the departure and arrival at the scene can have significant consequences in terms of death, injury and damage. Research on response times has received= limited attention due to restrictions in data access. This paper addresses this gap through investigating the spatial and temporal dynamics of residential fire incident response times in the Brisbane Statistical Division (BSD), Australia. Incident data supplied by the Queensland Fire and Emergency Service (QFES) for the period of 1998 to 2013 is analysed using a spatial analytic approach. Results show differences in response times across specific periods of the day, week and in particular seasons, and that the degree of this variation may reflect variations in the demand for service. Furthermore results show that response times also vary by space, however the degree of this variation are shown to be positively associated with population densities, i.e., locales with higher population densities experience faster response times, in particular the inner urban parts of the study area. We conclude through emphasising the importance of these results in their capacity to contribute to a new evidence base to inform policy decisions from a resource allocation perspective through the spatial and temporal allocation of finite resources.
Keyword Residential fire
Response time
Temporal dynamics
Spatial dynamics
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes http://soacconference.com.au/soac-conference-proceedings/

 
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Created: Mon, 04 Apr 2016, 19:13:55 EST by Genna Apted on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management