Distribution, abundance and size-structure of cerithiid gastropods in sediments at One Tree Reef, southern Great Barrier Reef

Skilleter, GA (1991) Distribution, abundance and size-structure of cerithiid gastropods in sediments at One Tree Reef, southern Great Barrier Reef. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 151 2: 185-207. doi:10.1016/0022-0981(91)90124-F


Author Skilleter, GA
Title Distribution, abundance and size-structure of cerithiid gastropods in sediments at One Tree Reef, southern Great Barrier Reef
Journal name Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0981
Publication date 1991-10-01
Year available 1991
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/0022-0981(91)90124-F
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 151
Issue 2
Start page 185
End page 207
Total pages 23
Place of publication AMSTERDAM
Publisher ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Language eng
Subject 1104 Complementary and Alternative Medicine
1105 Dentistry
2303 Ecology
Abstract The patterns of abundance of molluscs in sediments at One Tree Reef, southern Great Barrier Reef were determined for three adjacent habitats in October 1985: a shallow subtidal sandflat, a deep channel, and the sloping, unstable edge separating the two. Deposit-feeding cerithiid gastropods, especially Rhinoclavis aspera (Linnaeus, 1758), R. fasciata (Bruguière, 1792) and R. vertagus (Linnaeus, 1758), were the most abundant molluscs present but these species were predominantly found in the coarse sandy sediments of the sandflat. The abundances and sizes of these three species were monitored seasonally from October 1985 to January 1988 on the sandflat. Densities fluctuated during the three years of the study and varied at a number of spatial scales. The density of R. aspera was generally greater at the beginning of the year, after recruitment, then gradually declined until the next period of recruitment. This pattern was not as evident for R. fasciata or R. vertagus. Changes in size-frequency distributions through time suggest that movement of animals, either by migration and/or passive transport in the shifting sediments may contribute to the observed patterns. Comparisons are made between temperate and tropical soft-sediments habitats, especially in relation to the distribution of deposit-feeding organisms.
Keyword Abundance
Australia
Cerithiidae
Coral reef
Distribution
Rhinoclavis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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