Testing for a genetic response to sexual selection in a wild Drosophila population

Gosden, T. P., Thomson, J. R., Blows, M. W., Schaul, A. and Chenoweth, S. F. (2016) Testing for a genetic response to sexual selection in a wild Drosophila population. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 29 6: 1278-1283. doi:10.1111/jeb.12851


Author Gosden, T. P.
Thomson, J. R.
Blows, M. W.
Schaul, A.
Chenoweth, S. F.
Title Testing for a genetic response to sexual selection in a wild Drosophila population
Formatted title
Testing for a genetic response to sexual selection in a wild Drosophila population
Journal name Journal of Evolutionary Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1420-9101
1010-061X
Publication date 2016-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jeb.12851
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 29
Issue 6
Start page 1278
End page 1283
Total pages 6
Place of publication West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Subject 1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Abstract In accordance with the consensus that sexual selection is responsible for the rapid evolution of display traits on macroevolutionary scales, microevolutionary studies suggest sexual selection is a widespread and often strong form of directional selection in nature. However, empirical evidence for the contemporary evolution of sexually selected traits via sexual rather than natural selection remains weak. In this study, we used a novel application of quantitative genetic breeding designs to test for a genetic response to sexual selection on eight chemical display traits from a field population of the fly, Drosophila serrata. Using our quantitative genetic approach, we were able to detect a genetically based difference in means between groups of males descended from fathers who had either successfully sired offspring or were randomly collected from the same wild population for one of these display traits, the diene (Z,Z)-5,9-C. Our experimental results, in combination with previous laboratory studies on this system, suggest that both natural and sexual selection may be influencing the evolutionary trajectories of these traits in nature, limiting the capacity for a contemporary evolutionary response.
Formatted abstract
In accordance with the consensus that sexual selection is responsible for therapid evolution of display traits on macroevolutionary scales, microevolution-ary studies suggest sexual selection is a widespread and often strong form ofdirectional selection in nature. However, empirical evidence for the contem-porary evolution of sexually selected traits via sexual rather than naturalselection remains weak. In this study, we used a novel application of quanti-tative genetic breeding designs to test for a genetic response to sexual selec-tion on eight chemical display traits from a field population of the fly,Drosophila serrata. Using our quantitative genetic approach, we were able todetect a genetically based difference in means between groups of males des-cended from fathers who had either successfully sired offspring or were ran-domly collected from the same wild population for one of these display traits,the diene (Z,Z)-5,9-C27 : 2. Our experimental results, in combination withprevious laboratory studies on this system, suggest that both natural and sex-ual selection may be influencing the evolutionary trajectories of these traitsin nature, limiting the capacity for a contemporary evolutionary response.
Keyword Drosophila serrata
Contemporary evolution
Cuticular hydrocarbons
Quantitative genetics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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