Sitting time and physical activity after stroke: physical ability is only part of the story

English, Coralie, Healy, Genevieve N., Coates, Alison, Lewis, Lucy K., Olds, Tim and Bernhardt, Julie (2016) Sitting time and physical activity after stroke: physical ability is only part of the story. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 23 1: 62-68. doi:10.1179/1945511915Y.0000000009


Author English, Coralie
Healy, Genevieve N.
Coates, Alison
Lewis, Lucy K.
Olds, Tim
Bernhardt, Julie
Title Sitting time and physical activity after stroke: physical ability is only part of the story
Journal name Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1074-9357
1945-5119
Publication date 2016-02-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1179/1945511915Y.0000000009
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 23
Issue 1
Start page 62
End page 68
Total pages 7
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject 2742 Rehabilitation
2905 Community and Home Care
2728 Clinical Neurology
Abstract Background: Understanding factors that influence the amount of time people with stroke spend sitting and being active is important to inform the development of targeted interventions.
Formatted abstract
Background: Understanding factors that influence the amount of time people with stroke spend sitting and being active is important to inform the development of targeted interventions.

Objective: To explore the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial factors associated with daily sitting time and physical activity in people with stroke.

Method: Secondary analysis of an observational study (n = 50, mean age 67.2 ± 11.6 years, 33 men) of adults at least 6 months post-stroke. Activity monitor data were collected via a 7-day, continuous wear (24 hours/day) protocol. Sitting time [total, and prolonged (time in bouts of ≥ 30 minutes)] was measured with an activPAL3 activity monitor. A hip-worn Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer was used to measure moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) time. Univariate analyses examined relationships of stroke severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale), physical [walking speed, Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) physical domain score], cognitive (Montreal Cognitive Assessment), and psychosocial factors (living arrangement, SIS emotional domain score) with sitting time, prolonged sitting time, and MVPA.

Results: Self-reported physical function and walking speed were negatively associated with total sitting time (r = − 0.354, P = 0.022 and r = − 0.361, P = 0.011, respectively) and prolonged sitting time (r = − 0.5, P = 0.001 and − 0.45, P = 0.001, respectively), and positively associated with MVPA (r = 0.469, P = 0.002 and 0.431, P = 0.003, respectively).

Conclusions: Physical factors, such as walking ability, may influence sitting and activity time in people with stroke, yet much of the variance in daily sitting time remains unexplained. Large prospective studies are required to understand the drivers of activity and sitting time.
Keyword Stroke
Sedentary behaviors
Sitting time
Physical activity
Objective activity monitoring
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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