Concentrations of legacy and emerging flame retardants in air and soil on a transect in the UK West Midlands

Drage, Daniel S., Newton, Seth, de Wit, Cynthia A. and Harrad, Stuart (2016) Concentrations of legacy and emerging flame retardants in air and soil on a transect in the UK West Midlands. Chemosphere, 148 195-203. doi:10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.01.034


Author Drage, Daniel S.
Newton, Seth
de Wit, Cynthia A.
Harrad, Stuart
Title Concentrations of legacy and emerging flame retardants in air and soil on a transect in the UK West Midlands
Journal name Chemosphere   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0045-6535
1879-1298
Publication date 2016-04-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.01.034
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 148
Start page 195
End page 203
Total pages 9
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Language eng
Abstract Passive air samples were collected monthly for 6 months from 8 sites along a transect of Birmingham, United Kingdom between June 2012 and January 2013. Soil samples were collected once at each site. Average concentrations of BDE-209, σPBDEs17:183 and σPBDEs in ambient air were 150, 49, and 180 pg m-3, respectively. Atmospheric concentrations of PBDEs were negatively correlated with distance from the city centre, exhibiting an "urban pulse". The average σHBCDD air concentration was 100 pg m-3, however concentrations were not correlated with distance from the city centre. Several emerging flame retardants (EFRs) were identified in air and/or soil samples: 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (BEH-TEBP), 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2 dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (TBECH or DBE-DBCH), allyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE), 2-bromoallyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), and dechlorane plus (DP or DDC-CO). Average concentrations of BDE-209, σPBDEs17:183 and σPBDEs in soil were 11, 3.6, and 15 ng g-1 soil organic matter. PBDE concentrations in soil were higher at sites closest to the city centre, however correlations with distance from the city centre were not significant. BDEs-47 and -99 contributed more to σPBDEs in soil samples than air samples, but in both, the predominant congener was BDE-209. BATE was more abundant in air than soil but ATE was abundant in soil but not air.
Keyword PBDEs
HBCDD
HBCD
EFRs
Air
Soil
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology Publications
 
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