Vitamin D status during fetal life and childhood kidney outcomes

Miliku, K., Voortman, T., Franco, O. H., McGrath, J. J., Eyles, D. W., Burne, T. H., Hofman, A., Tiemeier, H. and Jaddoe, V. W. V. (2015) Vitamin D status during fetal life and childhood kidney outcomes. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 70 5: 629-634. doi:10.1038/ejcn.2015.216


Author Miliku, K.
Voortman, T.
Franco, O. H.
McGrath, J. J.
Eyles, D. W.
Burne, T. H.
Hofman, A.
Tiemeier, H.
Jaddoe, V. W. V.
Title Vitamin D status during fetal life and childhood kidney outcomes
Journal name European Journal of Clinical Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1476-5640
0954-3007
Publication date 2015-01-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/ejcn.2015.216
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 70
Issue 5
Start page 629
End page 634
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Language eng
Subject 2701 Medicine (miscellaneous)
2916 Nutrition and Dietetics
Abstract Background/Objectives:Maternal vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy may influence offspring kidney health. We aimed to examine the associations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) blood levels during fetal life with kidney outcomes at school age.Subjects/Methods:This study was embedded in a population-based prospective cohort study among 4212 mother-child pairs. We measured maternal second trimester (18-25 weeks) and fetal cord blood (at birth) 25(OH)D levels. At a median age of 6.0 years, we measured children's combined kidney volume, glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from creatinine and cystatin C serum levels, and microalbuminuria from albumin and creatinine urine levels.Results:Of all mothers, 21.9% had severely deficient levels (25(OH)D <25.0 nmol/l), 25.7% had deficient levels (25.0-49.9 nmol/l), 25% had sufficient levels (50.0-74.9 nmol/l) and 27.4% had optimal levels (≥75.0 nmol/l). Maternal 25(OH)D levels were not consistently associated with childhood combined kidney volume. Higher maternal 25(OH)D levels were associated with lower childhood eGFR (difference-0.94 ml/min per 1.73 m 2 (95% confidence interval,-1.73;-0.15) per 1 standard deviation (s.d.) increase in 25(OH)D). Maternal 25(OH)D levels were not associated with microalbuminuria. Cord blood 25(OH)D levels were not associated with childhood kidney outcomes. The associations of maternal 25(OH)D levels with childhood eGFR were partly explained by childhood vitamin D status.Conclusions:Our findings suggest that maternal 25(OH)D levels during pregnancy may influence childhood kidney outcomes. These results should be considered hypothesis generating. Further studies are needed to replicate the observations, to examine the underlying mechanisms and to identify the long-term clinical consequences.
Formatted abstract
Background/Objectives: Maternal vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy may influence offspring kidney health. We aimed to examine the associations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) blood levels during fetal life with kidney outcomes at school age.

Subjects/Methods: This study was embedded in a population-based prospective cohort study among 4212 mother–child pairs. We measured maternal second trimester (18–25 weeks) and fetal cord blood (at birth) 25(OH)D levels. At a median age of 6.0 years, we measured children’s combined kidney volume, glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from creatinine and cystatin C serum levels, and microalbuminuria from albumin and creatinine urine levels.

Results: Of all mothers, 21.9% had severely deficient levels (25(OH)D <25.0 nmol/l), 25.7% had deficient levels (25.0–49.9 nmol/l), 25% had sufficient levels (50.0–74.9 nmol/l) and 27.4% had optimal levels (greater than or equal to75.0 nmol/l). Maternal 25(OH)D levels were not consistently associated with childhood combined kidney volume. Higher maternal 25(OH)D levels were associated with lower childhood eGFR (difference −0.94 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (95% confidence interval, −1.73; −0.15) per 1 standard deviation (s.d.) increase in 25(OH)D). Maternal 25(OH)D levels were not associated with microalbuminuria. Cord blood 25(OH)D levels were not associated with childhood kidney outcomes. The associations of maternal 25(OH)D levels with childhood eGFR were partly explained by childhood vitamin D status.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that maternal 25(OH)D levels during pregnancy may influence childhood kidney outcomes. These results should be considered hypothesis generating. Further studies are needed to replicate the observations, to examine the underlying mechanisms and to identify the long-term clinical consequences.
Keyword Southampton Womens Survey
D Deficiency
Cystatin-C
Multiple Imputation
25-Hydroxyvitamin D
Pregnancy
Children
Health
Validation
Dietary
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID NHMRC APP1062846
APP1056929
VIDI 016.136.361
ERC-2014-CoG-648916
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2016 Collection
 
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Created: Sat, 12 Mar 2016, 01:52:58 EST by Susan Day on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute