Childhood behavior problems and fighting in early adulthood: what factors are protective?

Vassallo, Suzanne, Edwards, Ben and Forrest, Walter (2016) Childhood behavior problems and fighting in early adulthood: what factors are protective?. Journal of Criminal Justice, 45 85-93. doi:10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2016.02.010


Author Vassallo, Suzanne
Edwards, Ben
Forrest, Walter
Title Childhood behavior problems and fighting in early adulthood: what factors are protective?
Journal name Journal of Criminal Justice   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0047-2352
1873-6203
Publication date 2016-02-21
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2016.02.010
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 45
Start page 85
End page 93
Total pages 9
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 3207 Social Psychology
3202 Applied Psychology
3312 Sociology and Political Science
3308 Law
Abstract Purpose To identify factors that protected children with high externalizing problems at age 11–12 from fighting six to eight years later. Methods Regression models were used to identify risk-based and interactive protective factors against fighting at ages 17–18 and 19–20, among approximately 1100 Australian Temperament Project participants. To determine whether protective factors were developmentally-sensitive, analyses were repeated at four time points spanning ages 11 to 20. Results A number of protective factors were identified, however, few remained significant after controlling for other protective factors and demographic variables. Among high-risk youth, high self-control was consistently associated with lower levels of fighting at 19–20 (and to a lesser extent, 17–18). Positive relationships with teachers in early adolescence also emerged as a risk-based protective factor against fighting (at 19–20). Additionally, both factors appeared to moderate the influence of childhood behavior problems on subsequent fighting, exhibiting protective-enhancing effects. High responsibility and supportive peer relationships in late childhood were also found to be significant risk modifiers, with responsibility having a protective-enhancing effect against fighting, and peer relationships, a protective-stabilizing pattern. Conclusions Self-control was the most influential protective factor in reducing the risk of fighting at 17–18 and 19–20 for those with high childhood externalizing problems.
Formatted abstract
Purpose: To identify factors that protected children with high externalizing problems at age 11-12 from fighting six to eight years later.

Methods: Regression models were used to identify risk-based and interactive protective factors against fighting at ages 17-18 and 19-20, among approximately 1100 Australian Temperament Project participants. To determine whether protective factors were developmentally-sensitive, analyses were repeated at four time points spanning ages 11 to 20.

Results: A number of protective factors were identified, however, few remained significant after controlling for other protective factors and demographic variables. Among high-risk youth, high self-control was consistently associated with lower levels of fighting at 19-20 (and to a lesser extent, 17-18). Positive relationships with teachers in early adolescence also emerged as a risk-based protective factor against fighting (at 19-20). Additionally, both factors appeared to moderate the influence of childhood behavior problems on subsequent fighting, exhibiting protective-enhancing effects. High responsibility and supportive peer relationships in late childhood were also found to be significant risk modifiers, with responsibility having a protective-enhancing effect against fighting, and peer relationships, a protective-stabilizing pattern.

Conclusions: Self-control was the most influential protective factor in reducing the risk of fighting at 17-18 and 19-20 for those with high childhood externalizing problems.
Keyword Fighting
Violence
Externalizing problems
Protective factors
Longitudinal
Self-control
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 12 Mar 2016, 01:06:51 EST by Walter Forrest on behalf of School of Social Science