Early maternal reflective functioning and infant emotional regulation in a preterm infant sample at 6 months corrected age

Heron-Delaney, Michelle, Kenardy, Justin A., Brown, Erin A., Jardine, Chloe, Bogossian, Fiona, Neuman, Louise, de Dassel, Therese and Pritchard, Margo (2016) Early maternal reflective functioning and infant emotional regulation in a preterm infant sample at 6 months corrected age. Journal of Paediatric Psychology, 41 8: 906-914. doi:10.1093/jpepsy/jsv169


Author Heron-Delaney, Michelle
Kenardy, Justin A.
Brown, Erin A.
Jardine, Chloe
Bogossian, Fiona
Neuman, Louise
de Dassel, Therese
Pritchard, Margo
Title Early maternal reflective functioning and infant emotional regulation in a preterm infant sample at 6 months corrected age
Journal name Journal of Paediatric Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1465-735X
0146-8693
Publication date 2016-01-24
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/jpepsy/jsv169
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 41
Issue 8
Start page 906
End page 914
Total pages 9
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject 2735 Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
3204 Developmental and Educational Psychology
Abstract Objective This study investigated the influence of maternal reflective functioning (RF) on 6-month-old infants' emotional self-regulating abilities in preterm infant-mother dyads.aEuro integral Methods 25 preterm (gestational age 28-34.5 weeks) infants' affect, gaze toward mother, and self-soothing behaviors (thumb-sucking and playing with clothing) were measured during the still-face procedure at 6 months corrected age. Maternal RF was measured at 7-15 days post-delivery using the Parent Development Interview.aEuro integral ResultsaEuro integral Infants with high RF mothers showed the most negative affect during the still-face episode (M = 21.33s, SE = 5.44), whereas infants with low RF mothers showed the most negative affect in the reunion episode (M = 18.14s, SE = 3.69). Infants with high RF mothers showed significantly more self-soothing behaviors when distressed (Ms > 14.5s) than infants with low RF mothers (Ms < 1s), p's < .01.aEuro integral ConclusionaEuro integral Maternal RF was associated with infants' self-regulating behavior, providing preliminary evidence for the regulatory role of maternal RF in preterm infants' emotion regulation capacity.
Formatted abstract
Objective:  This study investigated the influence of maternal reflective functioning (RF) on 6-month-old infants’ emotional self-regulating abilities in preterm infant–mother dyads.

Methods:  25 preterm (gestational age 28–34.5 weeks) infants’ affect, gaze toward mother, and self-soothing behaviors (thumb-sucking and playing with clothing) were measured during the still-face procedure at 6 months corrected age. Maternal RF was measured at 7–15 days post-delivery using the Parent Development Interview.

Results:  Infants with high RF mothers showed the most negative affect during the still-face episode (M = 21.33s, SE = 5.44), whereas infants with low RF mothers showed the most negative affect in the reunion episode (M = 18.14s, SE = 3.69). Infants with high RF mothers showed significantly more self-soothing behaviors when distressed (Ms > 14.5s) than infants with low RF mothers (Ms < 1s), p’s < .01.

Conclusion:  Maternal RF was associated with infants’ self-regulating behavior, providing preliminary evidence for the regulatory role of maternal RF in preterm infants’ emotion regulation capacity.
Keyword Preterm Infants
Reflective Functioning
Relationship quality
Still-face paradigm
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Sun, 28 Feb 2016, 02:03:15 EST by Dr Fiona Bogossian on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work