Group ties protect cognitive health by promoting social identification and social support

Haslam, Catherine, Cruwys, Tegan, Milne, Matilda, Kan, Chi-Hsin and Haslam, S. Alexander (2016) Group ties protect cognitive health by promoting social identification and social support. Journal of Aging and Health, 28 2: 244-266. doi:10.1177/0898264315589578


Author Haslam, Catherine
Cruwys, Tegan
Milne, Matilda
Kan, Chi-Hsin
Haslam, S. Alexander
Title Group ties protect cognitive health by promoting social identification and social support
Journal name Journal of Aging and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1552-6887
0898-2643
Publication date 2016-03-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0898264315589578
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 28
Issue 2
Start page 244
End page 266
Total pages 23
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: Social relationships are protective of cognitive health as we age and recent findings show that social group ties (e.g., with community and peer groups) are especially important. The present research examines this relationship further to explore (a) the contribution of group, relative to interpersonal, ties and (b) underlying mechanism.
Method: Two cross-sectional survey studies were conducted. Study 1 was conducted online (N = 200) and Study 2 involved face-to-face interviews (N = 42).
Results: The findings confirmed group ties as a stronger predictor of cognitive health than individual ties. It also supported our proposed sequential mediation model suggesting that the benefits of group ties arise from their capacity to enhance a sense of shared social identification and this, in turn, provides the basis for effective social support.
Discussion: Both studies provided evidence consistent with claims that group ties were especially beneficial because they cultivated social identification that provided the foundation for social support.
Keyword Social group ties
Social identity
Social support
Cognitive function
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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