Increasing compliance with neuromuscular training to prevent ankle sprain in sport: does the 'Strengthen your ankle' mobile App make a difference? A randomised controlled trial

Van Reijen, M., Vriend, I., Zuidema, V., van Mechelen, W. and Verhagen, E. A. (2016) Increasing compliance with neuromuscular training to prevent ankle sprain in sport: does the 'Strengthen your ankle' mobile App make a difference? A randomised controlled trial. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 1-6. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2015-095290


Author Van Reijen, M.
Vriend, I.
Zuidema, V.
van Mechelen, W.
Verhagen, E. A.
Title Increasing compliance with neuromuscular training to prevent ankle sprain in sport: does the 'Strengthen your ankle' mobile App make a difference? A randomised controlled trial
Journal name British Journal of Sports Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1473-0480
0306-3674
Publication date 2016-01-18
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2015-095290
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background E-health has the potential to facilitate implementation of effective measures to prevent sports injuries.
Aim We evaluated whether an interactive mobile application containing a proven effective exercise programme to prevent recurrent ankle sprains resulted in higher compliance as compared with regular written exercise materials.
Methods 220 athletes participated in this randomised controlled trial with a follow-up of 8 weeks; 110 athletes received a booklet explaining an 8-week neuromuscular training programme; 110 athletes participated in the same programme in an interactive mobile App (Strengthen your ankle). The primary outcome was compliance with the exercise programme. Secondary outcome measure was the incidence density of self-reported recurrent ankle sprains.
Results The mean compliance to the exercise scheme was 73.3% (95% CI 67.7% to 78.1%) in the App group, compared with 76.7% (95% CI 71.9% to 82.3%) in the Booklet group. No significant difference in compliance was found between groups. The incidence densities of self-reported time-loss recurrences were not significantly different between both groups (HR 3.07; 95% CI 0.62 to 15.20).
Summary This study shows that the method of implementing the exercises by using an App or a Booklet does not lead to different compliance rates.
New findings The use of a mobile App or a Booklet lead to similar compliance and injury rates in the short term
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 18 January 2016

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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