Ambient temperature and risk of cardiovascular hospitalization: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis

Phung, Dung, Thai, Phong K., Guo, Yuming, Morawska, Lidia, Rutherford, Shannon and Chu, Cordia (2016) Ambient temperature and risk of cardiovascular hospitalization: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Science of the Total Environment, 550 2016: 1084-1102. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.01.154


Author Phung, Dung
Thai, Phong K.
Guo, Yuming
Morawska, Lidia
Rutherford, Shannon
Chu, Cordia
Title Ambient temperature and risk of cardiovascular hospitalization: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis
Journal name Science of the Total Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0048-9697
1879-1026
Publication date 2016-04-15
Year available 2016
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.01.154
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 550
Issue 2016
Start page 1084
End page 1102
Total pages 19
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 2305 Environmental Engineering
2304 Environmental Chemistry
2311 Waste Management and Disposal
2310 Pollution
Abstract The association between temperatures and risk of cardiovascular mortality has been recognized but the association drawn from previous meta-analysis was weak due to the lack of sufficient studies. This paper presented a review with updated reports in the literature about the risk of cardiovascular hospitalization in relation to different temperature exposures and examined the dose-response relationship of temperature-cardiovascular hospitalization by change in units of temperature, latitudes, and lag days. The pooled effect sizes were calculated for cold, heat, heatwave, and diurnal variation using random-effects meta-analysis, and the dose-response relationship of temperature-cardiovascular admission was modelled using random-effect meta-regression. The Cochrane Q-test and index of heterogeneity (I) were used to evaluate heterogeneity, and Egger's test was used to evaluate publication bias. Sixty-four studies were included in meta-analysis. The pooled results suggest that for a change in temperature condition, the risk of cardiovascular hospitalization increased 2.8% (RR, 1.028; 95% CI, 1.021-1.035) for cold exposure, 2.2% (RR, 1.022; 95% CI, 1.006-1.039) for heatwave exposure, and 0.7% (RR, 1.007; 95% CI, 1.002-1.012) for an increase in diurnal temperature. However no association was observed for heat exposure. The significant dose-response relationship of temperature - cardiovascular admission was found with cold exposure and diurnal temperature. Increase in one-day lag caused a marginal reduction in risk of cardiovascular hospitalizations for cold exposure and diurnal variation, and increase in latitude was associated with a decrease in risk of cardiovascular hospitalizations for diurnal temperature only. There is a significant short-term effect of cold exposure, heatwave and diurnal variation on cardiovascular hospitalizations. Further research is needed to understand the temperature-cardiovascular relationship for different climate areas.
Keyword Environmental Sciences
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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Created: Wed, 10 Feb 2016, 21:07:31 EST by Yuming Guo on behalf of School of Public Health