The global distribution of Banana bunchy top virus reveals little evidence for frequent recent, human-mediated long distance dispersal events

Stainton, Daisy, Martin, Darren P., Muhire, Brejnev M., Lolohea, Samiuela, Halafihi, Mana'ia, Lepoint, Pascale, Blomme, Guy, Crew, Kathleen S., Sharman, Murray, Kraberger, Simona, Dayaram, Anisha, Walters, Matthew, Collings, David A., Mabvakure, Batsirai, Lemey, Phillippe, Harkins, Gordon W., Thomas, John E. and Varsani, Arvind (2015) The global distribution of Banana bunchy top virus reveals little evidence for frequent recent, human-mediated long distance dispersal events. Virus Evolution, 1 1: vev009.1-vev009.16. doi:10.1093/ve/vev009


Author Stainton, Daisy
Martin, Darren P.
Muhire, Brejnev M.
Lolohea, Samiuela
Halafihi, Mana'ia
Lepoint, Pascale
Blomme, Guy
Crew, Kathleen S.
Sharman, Murray
Kraberger, Simona
Dayaram, Anisha
Walters, Matthew
Collings, David A.
Mabvakure, Batsirai
Lemey, Phillippe
Harkins, Gordon W.
Thomas, John E.
Varsani, Arvind
Title The global distribution of Banana bunchy top virus reveals little evidence for frequent recent, human-mediated long distance dispersal events
Formatted title
The global distribution of Banana bunchy top virus reveals little evidence for frequent recent, human-mediated long distance dispersal event
Journal name Virus Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2057-1577
Publication date 2015-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/ve/vev009
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 1
Issue 1
Start page vev009.1
End page vev009.16
Total pages 16
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Abstract (BBTV; family Nanoviridae, genus ) is a multi-component single-stranded DNA virus, which infects banana plants in many regions of the world, often resulting in large-scale crop losses. We analyzed 171 banana leaf samples from fourteen countries and recovered, cloned, and sequenced 855 complete BBTV components including ninety-four full genomes. Importantly, full genomes were determined from eight countries, where previously no full genomes were available (Samoa, Burundi, Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Indonesia, the Philippines, and the USA [HI]). Accounting for recombination and genome component reassortment, we examined the geographic structuring of global BBTV populations to reveal that BBTV likely originated in Southeast Asia, that the current global hotspots of BBTV diversity are Southeast Asia/Far East and India, and that BBTV populations circulating elsewhere in the world have all potentially originated from infrequent introductions. Most importantly, we find that rather than the current global BBTV distribution being due to increases in human-mediated movements of bananas over the past few decades, it is more consistent with a pattern of infrequent introductions of the virus to different parts of the world over the past 1,000 years.
Formatted abstract
Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV; family Nanoviridae, genus Babuvirus) is a multi-component single-stranded DNA virus, which infects banana plants in many regions of the world, often resulting in large-scale crop losses. We analyzed 171 banana leaf samples from fourteen countries and recovered, cloned, and sequenced 855 complete BBTV components including ninety-four full genomes. Importantly, full genomes were determined from eight countries, where previously no full genomes were available (Samoa, Burundi, Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Indonesia, the Philippines, and the USA [HI]). Accounting for recombination and genome component reassortment, we examined the geographic structuring of global BBTV populations to reveal that BBTV likely originated in Southeast Asia, that the current global hotspots of BBTV diversity are Southeast Asia/Far East and India, and that BBTV populations circulating elsewhere in the world have all potentially originated from infrequent introductions. Most importantly, we find that rather than the current global BBTV distribution being due to increases in human-mediated movements of bananas over the past few decades, it is more consistent with a pattern of infrequent introductions of the virus to different parts of the world over the past 1,000 years.
Keyword Banana bunchy top virus
Phylogeography
Nanoviridae
Babuvirus
Recombination
Reassortment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
Official 2016 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 09 Feb 2016, 01:55:01 EST by Melissa Rowan on behalf of Qld Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation