Evaluating the impact of medical care and technologies on the quality of life: A review and critique

Najman, JM and Levine, S (1981) Evaluating the impact of medical care and technologies on the quality of life: A review and critique. Social Science and Medicine. Part F Medical and Social Ethics, 15 2-3: 107-115. doi:10.1016/0271-5392(81)90012-5


Author Najman, JM
Levine, S
Title Evaluating the impact of medical care and technologies on the quality of life: A review and critique
Journal name Social Science and Medicine. Part F Medical and Social Ethics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0271-5392
Publication date 1981-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/0271-5392(81)90012-5
Volume 15
Issue 2-3
Start page 107
End page 115
Total pages 9
Language eng
Subject 2700 Medicine
2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
3305 Geography, Planning and Development
Abstract Recent publications by a number of critics of health care raise substantial questions about the benefits which derive from new medical technologies. The response of those who advocate these new technologies has broadened the argument, adding quality of life (QOL) considerations to previous claims which emphasize increased longevity. Unfortunately, the studies which purport to demonstrate an improved QOL do not incorporate relevant findings from a wide range of studies which emphasize the complex interplay of many subjective factors in the quantitative assessment of the QOL. There have been numerous studies of a wide range of medical interventions which employ QOL criteria. In the main, the inadequate research designs employed in these studies contrast with the sophisticated technology they purport to assess. A review of these studies indicates that few if any, procedures may be defended on the grounds that they improve the QOL. There is a need for studies involving adequately controlled samples using objective and subjective QOL indicators which address the manner in which objective QOL changes are subjectively interpreted. Until these studies become available, arguments for the impact of medical technologies on the QOL will be speculative and remain unconvincing.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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