Temperature affects germination of native Australian Gomphrena and Ptilotus species differently

Currey, C. J., Lopez, R. G., Cave, R. L., Harrison, D. K. and Johnston, M. E. (2015). Temperature affects germination of native Australian Gomphrena and Ptilotus species differently. In: R. A. Criley, XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014): International Symposium on Ornamental Horticulture in the Global Greenhouse. International Horticulture Congress, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, (491-498). 17-22 August 2014. doi:10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1104.71


Author Currey, C. J.
Lopez, R. G.
Cave, R. L.
Harrison, D. K.
Johnston, M. E.
Title of paper Temperature affects germination of native Australian Gomphrena and Ptilotus species differently
Formatted title
Temperature affects germination of native Australian Gomphrena and Ptilotus species differently
Conference name International Horticulture Congress
Conference location Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 17-22 August 2014
Proceedings title XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014): International Symposium on Ornamental Horticulture in the Global Greenhouse   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Acta Horticulturae   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Leuven, Belgium
Publisher International Society for Horticultural Science
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1104.71
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISBN 9789462610903
ISSN 0567-7572
Editor R. A. Criley
Volume 1104
Start page 491
End page 498
Total pages 8
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Seed germination is influenced by several environmental factors, including light and temperature. Several native Australian taxa in the Amaranth family (Amaranthaceae) have ornamental qualities that are prerequisites for commercialization of a new crop. Our objective was to quantify the effect of temperature on seed germination of native Australian forbs with desirable ornamental qualities. We germinated seeds of Gomphrena flaccida, Ptilotus exaltatus, P. spicatus, and P. macrocephalus across temperatures ranging from ≈8 to 30°C on a thermal gradient table. Seeds were monitored daily for germination. After 28 d, germination of P. macrocephalus and all three P. spicatus seed lots was 0 to 5 or 8%, respectively, across all temperatures. Alternatively, up to 85 and 90% of G. flaccida and P. exaltatus seeds germinated, respectively. The time to initial germination (t1) of G. flaccida was delayed by ≈5-11 d for temperatures below 17°C, whereas t1 of P. exaltatus was delayed by ≈5-9 d at 11°C compared to warmer temperatures. Although the metabolic rate of G. flaccida and P. exaltatus is similar, as indicated by reciprocal time to median germination (1/t50), the range of base (Tb) and optimum temperatures (Topt) for germination benchmarks varied between species. Our data indicate that G. flaccida requires higher temperatures during germination for maximizing cumulative germination and minimizing germination time compared to P. exaltatus.
Keyword Dormancy
Base temperature
Optimum temperature
Degree days
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2016 Collection
 
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Created: Tue, 02 Feb 2016, 21:57:20 EST by Mrs Robyn Cave on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences