Participatory mapping to identify indigenous community use zones: implications for conservation planning in southern Suriname

Ramirez-Gomez, Sara O. I., Brown, Greg, Verweij, Pita A. and Boot, René (2016) Participatory mapping to identify indigenous community use zones: implications for conservation planning in southern Suriname. Journal for Nature Conservation, 29 69-78. doi:10.1016/j.jnc.2015.11.004

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Ramirez-Gomez, Sara O. I.
Brown, Greg
Verweij, Pita A.
Boot, René
Title Participatory mapping to identify indigenous community use zones: implications for conservation planning in southern Suriname
Journal name Journal for Nature Conservation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1617-1381
1618-1093
Publication date 2016-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jnc.2015.11.004
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 29
Start page 69
End page 78
Total pages 10
Place of publication Muenchen, Germany
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 2303 Ecology
2309 Nature and Landscape Conservation
Abstract Large-scale development projects often overlap forest areas that support the livelihoods of indigenous peoples, threatening in situ conservation strategies for the protection of biological and cultural diversity. To address this problem, there is a need to integrate spatially-explicit information on ecosystem services into conservation planning. We present an approach for identifying conservation areas necessary to safeguard the provision of important ecosystem services for indigenous communities. "Community use zones" (CUZs) were generated using participatory mapping methods that identify place values indicating significant hotspots for ecosystem services. Using principles from landscape ecology, these areas are buffered to provide connectivity and to delineate ecosystem service delivery areas. We demonstrate the use of CUZs for five villages in southern Suriname (n = 191 participants) to inform the South Suriname Conservation Corridor project. The mapped data reveal overlapping hotspots for different ecosystem services depicting multifunctional landscapes that provide an empirical foundation for delineating CUZs. In the absence of legal and traditional land rights for indigenous people, CUZs based on the provision of ecosystem services provide a defensible, spatially explicit approach for integrating indigenous needs into regional conservation plans in southern Suriname. We discuss the utility of CUZ maps for promoting land tenure and security and as a basis for collaborative governance in indigenous and community-conserved areas (ICCAs).
Formatted abstract
Large-scale development projects often overlap forest areas that support the livelihoods of indigenous peoples, threatening in situ conservation strategies for the protection of biological and cultural diversity. To address this problem, there is a need to integrate spatially-explicit information on ecosystem services into conservation planning. We present an approach for identifying conservation areas necessary to safeguard the provision of important ecosystem services for indigenous communities. “Community use zones” (CUZs) were generated using participatory mapping methods that identify place values indicating significant hotspots for ecosystem services. Using principles from landscape ecology, these areas are buffered to provide connectivity and to delineate ecosystem service delivery areas. We demonstrate the use of CUZs for five villages in southern Suriname (n = 191 participants) to inform the South Suriname Conservation Corridor project. The mapped data reveal overlapping hotspots for different ecosystem services depicting multifunctional landscapes that provide an empirical foundation for delineating CUZs. In the absence of legal and traditional land rights for indigenous people, CUZs based on the provision of ecosystem services provide a defensible, spatially explicit approach for integrating indigenous needs into regional conservation plans in southern Suriname. We discuss the utility of CUZ maps for promoting land tenure and security and as a basis for collaborative governance in indigenous and community-conserved areas (ICCAs).
Keyword Community use zones
Ecosystem services
Indigenous conservation
Landscape ecology
Participatory mapping
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
HERDC Pre-Audit
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 02 Feb 2016, 10:23:07 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)