Helping lay carers of people with advanced cancer and their GPs to talk: an exploration of Australian users’ views of a simple carer health checklist

Burridge, Letitia, Mitchell, Geoffrey, Jiwa, Moyez and Girgis, Afaf (2015) Helping lay carers of people with advanced cancer and their GPs to talk: an exploration of Australian users’ views of a simple carer health checklist. Health and Social Care in the Community, 25 2: 357-365. doi:10.1111/hsc.12312


Author Burridge, Letitia
Mitchell, Geoffrey
Jiwa, Moyez
Girgis, Afaf
Title Helping lay carers of people with advanced cancer and their GPs to talk: an exploration of Australian users’ views of a simple carer health checklist
Journal name Health and Social Care in the Community   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0966-0410
1365-2524
Publication date 2015-12-23
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/hsc.12312
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 25
Issue 2
Start page 357
End page 365
Total pages 9
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Abstract The lay caregiving role is integral to advanced cancer care but places carers' health at risk. A supportive General Practitioner (GP) can help primary lay carers manage their health, if they disclose their concerns. A Needs Assessment Tool for Caregivers (NAT-C) was developed for carers to self-complete and use as the basis of a GP consultation, then tested in a randomised controlled trial. This paper reports a qualitative research study to determine the usefulness and acceptability of the NAT-C in the Australian primary care setting. Convenience samples of 11 carers and 5 GPs were interviewed between September 2010 and December 2011 regarding their experiences with and perceptions of the NAT-C. Open-ended questions were used, and the transcripts were analysed qualitatively to identify themes and patterns. Three major themes were identified: (a) Acceptability of the intervention; (b) Impact of the intervention on the GP-patient relationship; and (c) Place of the intervention in advanced cancer care. This simple checklist was acceptable to carers, although some were uncertain about the legitimacy of discussing their own needs with their GP. Carer-patients could not be certain whether a GP would be willing or equipped to conduct a NAT-C-based consultation. Such consultations were acceptable to most GPs, although some already used a holistic approach while others preferred brief symptom-based consultations. Although the NAT-C was acceptable to most carers and GPs, supportive consultations take time. This raises organisational issues to be addressed so carers can seek and benefit from their GP's support.
Keyword Carer
Communication
Consultation
General practitioner
Qualitative
Support
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Discipline of General Practice Publications
Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 01 Feb 2016, 22:27:25 EST by Dr Letitia Burridge on behalf of School of Medicine