Where do you belong? Identity, New Guinea islanders, and the power of Peles

McGavin, Kirsten (2016) Where do you belong? Identity, New Guinea islanders, and the power of Peles. Oceania, 86 1: 57-74. doi:10.1002/ocea.5112


Author McGavin, Kirsten
Title Where do you belong? Identity, New Guinea islanders, and the power of Peles
Formatted title
Where do you belong? Identity, New Guinea islanders, and the power of Peles
Journal name Oceania   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1834-4461
0029-8077
Publication date 2016-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/ocea.5112
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 86
Issue 1
Start page 57
End page 74
Total pages 18
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Peles is a Melanesian concept related to the grounding of a person's Indigenous origin in a particular place. This notion is especially important in Papua New Guinea where, upon first meeting, people are likely to ask, 'Where are you from?' Ascertaining someone's peles enables the rapid establishment between previously unknown people of social connections and obligations, kinship, and identity. Despite the increasing influences of westernisation, globalisation, urbanisation, and migration, peles remains steadfast at the centre of Papua New Guinean social identity construction. This article addresses the current and emerging ways in which people of New Guinea Islander descent - both at 'home' or in the diaspora - connect to peles, whether physically or otherwise and details the social politics of these assertions.
Keyword Identity
Papua New Guinea
Peles
Place
Wantok system
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Social Science Publications
 
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