Strategies and approaches to vector control in nine malaria-eliminating countries: A cross-case study analysis

Smith Gueye, Cara, Newby, Gretchen, Gosling, Roland D., Whittaker, Maxine A., Chandramohan, Daniel, Slutsker, Laurence and Tanner, Marcel (2016) Strategies and approaches to vector control in nine malaria-eliminating countries: A cross-case study analysis. Malaria Journal, 15 2: . doi:10.1186/s12936-015-1054-z


Author Smith Gueye, Cara
Newby, Gretchen
Gosling, Roland D.
Whittaker, Maxine A.
Chandramohan, Daniel
Slutsker, Laurence
Tanner, Marcel
Title Strategies and approaches to vector control in nine malaria-eliminating countries: A cross-case study analysis
Journal name Malaria Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1475-2875
Publication date 2016-01-04
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-1054-z
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 15
Issue 2
Total pages 14
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: There has been progress towards malaria elimination in the last decade. In response, WHO launched the Global Technical Strategy (GTS), in which vector surveillance and control play important roles. Country experiences in the Eliminating Malaria Case Study Series were reviewed to identify success factors on the road to elimination using a cross-case study analytic approach.

Methods: Reports were included in the analysis if final English language draft reports or publications were available at the time of analysis (Bhutan, Cape Verde, Malaysia, Mauritius, Namibia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Turkey, Turkmenistan). A conceptual framework for vector control in malaria elimination was developed, reviewed, formatted as a matrix, and case study data was extracted and entered into the matrix. A workshop was convened during which participants conducted reviews of the case studies and matrices and arrived at a consensus on the evidence and lessons. The framework was revised and a second round of data extraction, synthesis and summary of the case study reports was conducted.

Results: Countries implemented a range of vector control interventions. Most countries aligned with integrated vector management, however its impact was not well articulated. All programmes conducted entomological surveillance, but the response (i.e., stratification and targeting of interventions, outbreak forecasting and strategy) was limited or not described. Indoor residual spraying (IRS) was commonly used by countries. There were several examples of severe reductions or halting of IRS coverage and subsequent resurgence of malaria. Funding and operational constraints and poor implementation had roles. Bed nets were commonly used by most programmes; coverage and effectiveness were either not measured or not articulated. Larval control was an important intervention for several countries, preventing re-introduction, however coverage and impact on incidence were not described. Across all interventions, coverage indicators were incomparable, and the rationale for which tools were used and which were not used appeared to be a function of the availability of funding, operational issues and cost instead of evidence of effectiveness to reduce incidence.

Conclusions: More work is required to fill gaps in programme guidance, clarify the best methods for choosing and targeting vector control interventions, and support to measure cost, cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of vector surveillance and control interventions.
Keyword Control
Eliminating
Elimination
Entomology
Indoor residual spraying
Long-lasting insecticidal nets
Malaria
Surveillance
Vector
Vector control
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 19 Jan 2016, 10:24:14 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)