Medication knowledge and willingness to nurse-initiate medications in an emergency department: a mixed-methods study

Cabilan, C. J., Eley, Robert, Hughes, James A. and Sinnott, Michael (2016) Medication knowledge and willingness to nurse-initiate medications in an emergency department: a mixed-methods study. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 72 2: 396-408. doi:10.1111/jan.12840


Author Cabilan, C. J.
Eley, Robert
Hughes, James A.
Sinnott, Michael
Title Medication knowledge and willingness to nurse-initiate medications in an emergency department: a mixed-methods study
Journal name Journal of Advanced Nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1365-2648
0309-2402
Publication date 2016-02-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jan.12840
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 72
Issue 2
Start page 396
End page 408
Total pages 13
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aims To assess the medication knowledge of emergency department nurses and determine the factors affecting their nurse-initiated medication practices.
Background Nurse-initiated medications is a vital practice for all nurses in emergency departments which improves pain assessment, provides safe pain management and reduces time-to-analgesia and other meaningful treatments.
Design Mixed methods. Between September 2014–January 2015, data were collected by questionnaire assessing medication knowledge and face-to-face interviews determining factors affecting practice.
Results Nurse-initiated medications frequency of the Registered Nurses ranged from 0-36 times per week dependent on employed hours and emergency department area worked. Medication knowledge was consistent among nurses, but there was an overall deficit in nurses' knowledge of mechanism of action. Four major themes were identified from the 24 interviews: patient-centred care, caution and safety as principles of practice; continuing support and education; improvement of practice over time. All nurses regard the practice positively and to be extremely beneficial to patients. Although apprehensive at the start of their nurse-initiated medications practice, confidence improved with exposure and experience. Nurses sought additional information from colleagues and the available evidence-based resources.
Conclusion Medication knowledge is not the sole determinant of nurse-initiated medications practice. The practice is motivated by multiple factors such as patients' needs, safety and nurses' confidence.
Keyword Accident and emergency
Clinical decision-making
Medication
Mixed method design
Non-medical prescribing
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 4 November 2015

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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