How fast should an animal run when escaping? An optimality model based on the trade-off between speed and accuracy

Wheatley, Rebecca, Angilletta Jr., Michael J., Niehaus, Amanda C. and Wilson, Robbie S. (2015). How fast should an animal run when escaping? An optimality model based on the trade-off between speed and accuracy. In: Towards a General Framework for Predicting Animal Movement Speeds in Nature, West Palm Beach, Florida, (1166-1175). 3-7 January 2015. doi:10.1093/icb/icv091


Author Wheatley, Rebecca
Angilletta Jr., Michael J.
Niehaus, Amanda C.
Wilson, Robbie S.
Title of paper How fast should an animal run when escaping? An optimality model based on the trade-off between speed and accuracy
Conference name Towards a General Framework for Predicting Animal Movement Speeds in Nature
Conference location West Palm Beach, Florida
Conference dates 3-7 January 2015
Convener Wilson, Robbie S.
Journal name Integrative and Comparative Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Publication Year 2015
Year available 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1093/icb/icv091
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISSN 1557-7023
1540-7063
Volume 55
Issue 6
Start page 1166
End page 1175
Total pages 10
Language eng
Abstract/Summary How fast should animals move when trying to survive? Although many studies have examined how fast animals can move, the fastest speed is not always best. For example, an individual escaping from a predator must run fast enough to escape, but not so fast that it slips and falls. To explore this idea, we developed a simple mathematical model that predicts the optimal speed for an individual running from a predator along a straight beam. A beam was used as a proxy for straight-line running with severe consequences for missteps. We assumed that success, defined as reaching the end of the beam, had two broad requirements: (1) running fast enough to escape a predator, and (2) minimizing the probability of making a mistake that would compromise speed. Our model can be tailored to different systems by revising the predator’s maximal speed, the prey’s stride length and motor coordination, and the dimensions of the beam. Our model predicts that animals should run slower when the beam is narrower or when coordination is worse.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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