Employing phylogenomics to resolve the relationships among Cnidarians, Ctenophores, Sponges, Placozoans, and Bilaterians

Whelan, Nathan V., Kocot, Kevin M. and Halanych, Kenneth M. (2015). Employing phylogenomics to resolve the relationships among Cnidarians, Ctenophores, Sponges, Placozoans, and Bilaterians. In: Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, West Palm Beach, Florida, United States, (1084-1095). 3-7 January 2015. doi:10.1093/icb/icv037


Author Whelan, Nathan V.
Kocot, Kevin M.
Halanych, Kenneth M.
Title of paper Employing phylogenomics to resolve the relationships among Cnidarians, Ctenophores, Sponges, Placozoans, and Bilaterians
Conference name Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology
Conference location West Palm Beach, Florida, United States
Conference dates 3-7 January 2015
Convener Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology
Journal name Integrative and Comparative Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1093/icb/icv037
ISSN 1557-7023
1540-7063
Volume 55
Issue 6
Start page 1084
End page 1095
Total pages 12
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Despite an explosion in the amount of sequence data, phylogenomics has failed to settle controversy regarding some critical nodes on the animal tree of life. Understanding relationships among Bilateria, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, and Porifera is essential for studying how complex traits such as neurons, muscles, and gastrulation have evolved. Recent studies have cast doubt on the historical viewpoint that sponges are sister to all other animal lineages with recent studies recovering ctenophores as sister. However, the ctenophore–sister hypothesis has been criticized as unrealistic and caused by systematic error. We review past phylogenomic studies and potential causes of systematic error in an effort to identify areas that can be improved in future studies. Increased sampling of taxa, less missing data, and a priori removal of sequences and taxa that may cause systematic error in phylogenomic inference will likely be the most fruitful areas of focus when assembling future datasets. Ultimately, we foresee metazoan relationships being resolved with higher support in the near future, and we caution against dismissing novel hypotheses merely because they conflict with historical viewpoints of animal evolution.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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